"Be at peace"

< Previous | Next >

Divi

New Member
US, English
Hi- I'm trying to get a good Dutch translation for "be at peace", but there are so many different ways to word it (and I don't know enough Dutch to know which is correct) so I figured I'd ask. Online translators have conjured up

"Ben bij vrede", "Ik ga bij vrede zijn", and "Ik zal zijn bij vrede".

I realize the last two are (hopefully) some translation of "I will be at peace" instead of just "be at peace", but if any are correct I'll take it. I'm not even sure if they're accurate at all because in this sense "be" is imperative and I don't know how to translate that properly. What would be the best way to say either one?

Thanks for any help. :D
 
  • theo1006

    Senior Member
    Netherlands
    Hi Divi,

    It all depends on the context. I take it that you want to translate the imperative ‘be at peace’ and not the infinitive ‘to be at peace’. The imperative would be a greeting.

    The only context I can imagine where Dutch people would use a greeting like that, is in a religious or semi-religious setting.
    You have the parting wish, like what the minister says to the congregation at the conclusion of service: Gaat heen in vrede (leave in peace). Or you have the Biblical greeting of the angel to Maria: Vrede zij met U (peace be with you).
    Perhaps in circles of modern religiosity (like New Age) people may say Vrede in je hart (peace in your heart).
    But I cannot imagine the literal translation Wees vredig to be used anywhere. Sounds awkward. The preposition bij does not fit with vrede either. One can say het land leefde in vrede (the country was at peace), but not bij vrede.

    Can you tell more about the context?
     

    Mimi2005

    Senior Member
    dutch/english
    If "be at peace" in this context could mean "be happy with it, be satisfied, be content" , then it can also be translated as "wees tevreden". Otherwise all the answers above can apply.
     

    Divi

    New Member
    US, English
    Hi Divi,

    It all depends on the context. I take it that you want to translate the imperative ‘be at peace’ and not the infinitive ‘to be at peace’. The imperative would be a greeting.

    The only context I can imagine where Dutch people would use a greeting like that, is in a religious or semi-religious setting.
    You have the parting wish, like what the minister says to the congregation at the conclusion of service: Gaat heen in vrede (leave in peace). Or you have the Biblical greeting of the angel to Maria: Vrede zij met U (peace be with you).
    Perhaps in circles of modern religiosity (like New Age) people may say Vrede in je hart (peace in your heart).
    But I cannot imagine the literal translation Wees vredig to be used anywhere. Sounds awkward. The preposition bij does not fit with vrede either. One can say het land leefde in vrede (the country was at peace), but not bij vrede.

    Can you tell more about the context?
    Yes, I do mean the imperative. Maybe 'in peace' is better, although I'm not sure. I don't mean it in a religious context per say, but I'm using 'peace' as a more powerful phrase than 'personal contentment'. (Because to be content isn't quite as powerful.) I suppose I mean it in a somewhat eulogistic way, like wishing it on a person; for a person to 'be at/in peace'.
     

    theo1006

    Senior Member
    Netherlands
    If you want to use the word Vrede then I think Vrede in je hart! may be best, as it is not necessarily connected with religion.
    The suggestion Wees tevreden somehow makes me feel that the person you address the wish to is not quite satisfied, whereas you think he should be. I was thinking of alternatives without the use of vrede, but they have the same defect, e.g. Maak je geen zorgen suggests that the person is worrying.

    Bye, Theo
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top