be averse to, be opposed to

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everpine

Senior Member
Korean
Blue may be the most preferred colour but in many circumstances, for example in food colouring, people would be averse to blue, and in other circumstances, for example, the preferred colour of cars, blue would be less popular than other colours, such as red.​

Can we safely change the word "averse" to "opposed" without maiming original meaning of the sentence?
 
  • srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It's hard to be opposed to a color. Opposed to the selection of that color, perhaps. I think "offended" or "disgusted" by it might be better for food coloring. "Averse" to it probably works best.
     
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