be <better><more> off than

huynhvantinhftu

Senior Member
Vietnamese
(1) Moneywise, I am much better off than I used to be.

This sentence means that: now I am poorer than I was. Is it right?
Can I replace "better" with "more" without changing the meaning?

I hope to receive your advice.
Many thanks for your time and helping.
 
  • MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    "better off than"
    This sentence means that: now I am poorer than I was. Is it right? NO
    better off : in a more desirable or advantageous position, especially in financial terms. = you have more money!
     

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    "better off than"
    This sentence means that: now I am poorer than I was. Is it right? NO
    better off : in a more desirable or advantageous position, especially in financial terms. = you have more money!
    Can you tell me what is the meaning of "I am off"
    In my opinion, "I am off" = I am poor (this meaning is based on the third meaning - To be slightly unwell or in poor condition).

    be off
    Meaning of "be off":
    1. To leave a place or to depart to another one. Though formerly used as an imperative, this use is now rare. I'm justoff to the bar for a few drinks, I shouldn't be there long. I think I'll be off, talk to you soon.
    2. Of food, to be spoiled, rotten, or past its prime. This chicken is definitely off, it stinks!
    3. To be slightly unwell or in poor condition. My stomach is off, I think it's from something I ate. I'm not sure what'swrong, I'm just a bit off today.
    4. To be incorrect, faulty, or in poor condition. Often used with qualifying words, such as "a bit," "far," "really," etc. Itwas a nice guess, but you're a little off. That radio is a bit off, it's picking up mostly static. I think we need a differentcolor paint, this one is a little off.
    5. Without obligation to or free from something, especially work or school. I'm finally off for my summer vacation!Jonah's off today, he'll be back in the office on Monday.
    6. In stocks and finance, to be trading at a value lower than the previous one or lower than the value that wasexpected or hoped for. The market is off by a huge margin today. This could spell trouble for the economic recovery.The company's stocks are off another 200 points as of this afternoon.
    7. To be somewhat strange, crazy, or awkward. Often used with "a bit" or "a little." There's a guy on our corner whoshouts about the end of the world; I think he's a little off.

    It is why I think: "I am better off" = I am more off = I am poorer
    Can you explain to me what is wrong?
     
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    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "I am off" does not mean "I am poor." "Poor," in the dictionary definitions you have quoted above, does not mean "impoverished" or "without money."

    To be "well off" means to be wealthy. If you are not as well off as someone else, they are better off than you. If you are poorer than you once were, then you used to be better off than you are now.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "I am off" does not mean "I am poor."

    To be "well off" means to be wealthy. If you are not as well off as someone else, they are better off than you. If you are poorer than you once were, then you used to be better off than you are now.
    :thumbsup:

    In definition #3, 'in poor condition' means 'unwell', not 'poverty-stricken/impoverished/hard up'.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "I am better off now than last year" means "my life is better now than it was last year".

    "I am off" makes no sense in English, except in a few specific situations.
     
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