be comfortable <doing/to do> something

vinci61

Senior Member
Chinese
I am comfortable speaking French now.
Can this sentence change into I am comfortable to speak Freanch now.

And what is the difference here?
Because normally we use to infinitive after adjectives, such as I am happy to do that.
Thank you for all your answers here.:)
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I am comfortable speaking French now.
    Can this sentence change into I am comfortable to speak Freanch now.

    And what is the difference here?
    Because normally we use to infinitive after adjectives, such as I am happy to do that.
    Thank you for all your answers here.:)
    The example sentence with "I am comfortable to speak" is not correct.

    I don't agree we normally use "to" infinitives after adjectives.

    1. "I am happy doing that." is a normal thing to say.

    2. "I am happy to do that.", with the same meaning as 1, is not said.

    3. "I am happy to do that (for you)" is a normal thing to say. We leave off the "for you" part when itis obvious from the situation.

    We do use the to-infinitive after an adjective in the form "It is <adj> to do <verb>", which means "Doing <verb> is <adj>":

    It is fun to party. Partying is fun.
    It is boring to study. Studying is boring.

    There may be other sentence forms where a to-infinitive is correct after an adjective. "We use to-infinitives after adjectives" is too broad a rule -- it is neither always true nor always false.
     
    Last edited:

    vinci61

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The example sentence with "I am comfortable to speak" is not correct.

    I don't agree we normally use "to" infinitives after adjectives.

    1. "I am happy doing that." is a normal thing to say.

    2. "I am happy to do that.", with the same meaning as 1, is not said.

    3. "I am happy to do that (for you)" is a normal thing to say. We leave off the "for you" part when itis obvious from the situation.

    We do use the to-infinitive after an adjective in the form "It is <adj> to do <verb>", which means "Doing <verb> is <adj>":

    It is fun to party. Partying is fun.
    It is boring to study. Studying is boring.

    There may be other sentence forms where a to-infinitive is correct after an adjective. "We use to-infinitives after adjectives" is too broad a rule -- it is neither always true nor always false.
    Thank you for your great answer, but somehow you made it hard for me to understand.
    What about I am sorry to hear that<for you>? I heard I am sorry to hear that many times. I am sorry hearing that?:confused::confused::confused:
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    You are right. I should not say we don't use "to" infinitives after adjectives. Some uses are okay, others are not.

    I am sorry to hear that.:tick:
    I am sorry to hear that for you.:thumbsdown:
    I am sorry hearing that.:confused:
    I felt sorry hearing that.:tick:
    I am comfortable to speak French. :thumbsdown:
    I am comfortable speaking French.:tick:
    I am happy to meet you.:tick:
    I am happy to play basketball.:thumbsdown:

    When I google "to infinitive after adjective" I get links to several grammar websites. The first one has a long list of adjectives that allow an infinitive after them:

    to + infinitive
     

    vinci61

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You are right. I should not say we don't use "to" infinitives after adjectives. Some uses are okay, others are not.

    I am sorry to hear that.:tick:
    I am sorry to hear that for you.:thumbsdown:
    I am sorry hearing that.:confused:
    I felt sorry hearing that.:tick:
    I am comfortable to speak French. :thumbsdown:
    I am comfortable speaking French.:tick:
    I am happy to meet you.:tick:
    I am happy to play basketball.:thumbsdown:

    When I google "to infinitive after adjective" I get links to several grammar websites. The first one has a long list of adjectives that allow an infinitive after them:

    to + infinitive
    So you meant except for certain adjectives you use gerund after adjectives more often? You guys prefer gerund? Hope that is what you meant. Because other than this, I will find no so-called rules. Non native speakers are bad at understanding no-rule thing.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top