BE cot = AE crib?

RM1(SS)

Senior Member
English - US (Midwest)
The phrase that I hear 73 times a week, though, is "he's throwing his toys out of the pram [again]" or "he's throwing his toys out of the cot [again]" . In other words, as ewie says, "he's having another childish tantrum".
To me, this is a cot. This baby bed is a crib. Which sort of bed do you BE speakers have in mind when reading Loob's post?
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, a box-like baby's bed with slatted wooden sides is a cot in BrE. Sometimes, you also get the phrase baby cot. I associate crib with the place where Jesus was laid in the manger scene.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    You could spend at least 73 hours in the coming week reviewing the words that are different between American and British English - crib and cot are under c in this wiki list. It's a good place to search if you suspect a BE/AE difference in usage/meaning. It confirms the comments above from the AE and BE members:eek:
     
    Last edited:

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    Yes, but just to complete the comparison in the WR dictionary, which does not make any distinction in its four definitions:

    AE cot = the #2 definition in our dictionary - a collapsible or portable bed.

    Nothing to do with babies… it's all about camping.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Oxford Dictionaries does a better job, I think:

    cot1
    Pronunciation: /kɒt/
    British
    • a small bed with high barred sides for a baby or very young child.
    • a plain narrow bed.
    • North American a camp bed.
    • Nautical a bed resembling a hammock hung from deck beams, formerly used by officers.
    Origin: mid 17th century (originally Anglo-Indian, denoting a light bedstead): from Hindi khāṭ 'bedstead, hammock'
    The second sense (narrow bed) is still available in BrE, but isn't common. Also, AmE crib death = BrE ​cot death
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top