Be hasty x rush things

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

I'd like to know if there is any difference between "be hasty" and "rush things" in the contexts below. Please, take a look.

1. I think I rushed things when I asked her out. I could've waited a bit more, until we were more familiar with each other.

2. I think I was hasty when I asked her out. I could've waited a bit more, until we were more familiar with each other.

*Which of them [rush things x be hasty] is the better option in this context?

Rush things x be hasty= do something before the time you should do it.

Thank you very much in advance!
 
  • wisemeat

    Member
    American English
    In the context you've provided, "rushed things" would be more appropriate, as it implies you asked her out too quickly. "Being hasty" just means doing it quickly, but not necessarily too quickly.

    Now if you said "I think I was too hasty when I asked her out..." then they would be interchangeable.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In the context you've provided, "rushed things" would be more appropriate, as it implies you asked her out too quickly. "Being hasty" just means doing it quickly, but not necessarily too quickly.
    I"ve always thought of "hasty" as including the "too quickly" part. It is an impulsive decision or action without proper thought given to it.

    Can you think of an example where "hasty" means "quickly" without meaning "too quickly"? "Too hasty" implies that there is a "just hasty enough", :) which doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

    "Rushed things" implies that the woman might have been imposed upon.
    "Hasty" implies that you were personally unsure and perhaps mistaken.
    I agree. Hasty, to me, is a comment on his own feelings about how quickly he asked her. "Rushed things" is an evaluation of her reaction to being asked. They have different focuses.
     

    wisemeat

    Member
    American English
    "Hasty" is obviously from "haste," which means "quick" or "fast," but I never really thought of it as meaning an overabundance of quickness. I could be wrong, but that's how I've always known it.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Good question. To me, yes. A hasty withdrawal, to me, would be one that was done so quickly that it was done without thought, as opposed to a "rapid withdrawal from the scene" which might have been planned and executed well.

    In other words, to me it has a built-in negative connotation in contemporary English.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    From the O.E.D.:
    Haste
    I. 1. Urgency or impetuosity of movement resulting in or tending to swiftness or rapidity; quickness, speed, expedition (properly of voluntary action). Opposed to leisurely motion or action.
    2. Such quickness of action as excludes due consideration or reflection; hurry, precipitancy, want of deliberation, rashness. (See also 4 b, 6.)
     
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