Be home / be at home

Bloody_Mary

New Member
Español
Hello, I have a question about the difference between "be home" and "be at home"; but first of all, I'd like to tell you how I have distinguished them until now.
- Home without "at" when the previous verb indicates directions. "I will arrive / go / come home late tonight".
- "at" home when the previous verb doesn't indicate directions and also in the situation when you have just arrived ("Hi! I'm home!")
I would like to know if it is correct. Bearing all this in mind, why do you think the preposition "at" is omitted in the following sentence? "It felt good to finally be home". It appears on a text book.
Thanks
 
  • TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Hola.

    Según entiendo, con verbos de movimiento no se usa preposición (en cualquier caso no se usaría "at", sino "to"); con verbos de estado, la preposición "at" puede bien usarse, bien omitirse (sobre todo en el habla informal).

    also in the situation when you have just arrived ("Hi! I'm home!")
    why do you think the preposition "at" is omitted in the following sentence? "It felt good to finally be home"
    No creo que pueda omitirse solo en caso de que uno acabe de regresar a casa. De hecho son comunes expresiones como "Is anybody home?" o "Nobody's home" (el título de una canción de Avril Lavigne).

    A ver qué nos cuentan los nativos.
     

    markonhelp

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Según entiendo, con verbos de movimiento no se usa preposición (en cualquier caso no se usaría "at", sino "to"); con verbos de estado, la preposición "at" puede bien usarse, bien omitirse (sobre todo en el habla informal).
    Yo creo que los verbos de movimiento sí que necesitan una preposición para que defina en qué dirección va el sujeto. No se me ocurre un verbo de movimiento que no use una preposición para indicar el destino.

    I would like to know if it is correct. Bearing all this in mind, why do you think the preposition "at" is omitted in the following sentence? "It felt good to finally be home".
    Yo creo que porque "home" también funciona como adverbio, por ende, puede prescindir de una preposición. Sin embargo cuando usamos "house", la preposición no puede omitirse.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Yo creo que los verbos de movimiento sí que necesitan una preposición para que defina en qué dirección va el sujeto. No se me ocurre un verbo de movimiento que no use una preposición para indicar el destino.
    Perdón, me expresé mal. Me refería a que "home" no rige la preposición "to" con los verbos de movimiento (go home, come home, return home).
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yo creo que los verbos de movimiento sí que necesitan una preposición para que defina en qué dirección va el sujeto. No se me ocurre un verbo de movimiento que no use una preposición para indicar el destino.
    "Home" is a somewhat odd word in English, because we use it in ways that often seem inconsistent with normal grammar rules. Logically, you might think that we should say "I am going to home," but we never say that. In that construction, "home" is not a noun, but an adverb, which seems strange at first, but less so if you think of "home" as being "homeward." We only use prepositions with "home" when it is used as a noun.

    Ex.
    I received a letter from home. (noun)
    She sent her letter home. (adverb)

    When used with verbs of motion, we generally treat "home" as an adverb, and therefore do not use a preposition. For this reason, it's hard to think of a situation when I would say "to home." However, "at" is commonly used.

    Make yourself at home! (Siéntase [como] en su casa)

    There are also many contexts where "at" may be used or omitted.

    She'll be [at] home for two weeks.
    I'm more relaxed when I'm [at] home.
     
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