be home for a stint

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Alix France

Senior Member
Français
Hello,

I don't understand the meaning of the word "stint" in this sentence:

I'll be home on the 22nd December for a stint.

Stint means usually "a working period", but in this sentence it seems to be completely the opposite: "a pause/halt"

I'm confused....


(the original sentence is "I'll be home on the 22nd December for a stent." but I think that the girl who writes it made a mistake (I hope...), she's only 21 years old...)
 
  • Omelette

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If it’s ‘stent’, I’ve no idea. :) You’re right about ‘stint’ normally relating to work, but it could be used more generally to mean ‘a stay’ – un séjour’. Or just ‘a period of time’. As in this newspaper headline: ‘Baby Easton returns home after short stint in Syracuse hospital.’.
     

    emmsy

    Senior Member
    UK English
    A stent is a device put in the veins to keep them open, so unless it is an operation to have one inserted, (which is unlikely at 21!) I agree with Omlette I tend to think of stint as a period of time one passes, regardless of activity.
     
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