be in abeyance of something

Alacer

Senior Member
Russia, Russian
Do I use this formal phrase correctly here?

Nowadays the general tendency to creating smaller electronic devices has led to the process improvement being in abeyance of the development of the new technology, spintronics, where electron spin serves as a carrier of the information bit, to the necessary extent.

Is this phrase used in everyday English?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Nowadays the general tendency for creating smaller electronic devices has led to improvement of the process being held in abeyance in favour of the development of a new technology, spintronics, where electron spin serves as a carrier of the information bit, to the necessary extent.
    To hold something in abeyance is a common enough expression. I think you would hold one thing in abeyance because of something else - see suggested changes above.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Do I use this formal phrase correctly here?

    Nowadays the general tendency to creating smaller electronic devices has led to the process improvement being in abeyance of the development of the new technology, spintronics, where electron spin serves as a carrier of the information bit, to the necessary extent.

    Is this phrase used in everyday English?

    Thanks in advance!
    Perhaps it's the topic, Alacer, but this sentence needs work, I'm afraid. I know that I'll be differed with but I hate the word "nowadays", especially in a formal text. I also think you want "create", not "creating". I have no idea what you mean by "the process improvement being in abeyance of the development..." As well, "to the necessary extent" seems oddly misplaced, if necessary at all. I also think that you should break this into two sentences.

    No, this is far from "everyday English".
     

    Alacer

    Senior Member
    Russia, Russian
    Thank you very much! I see now... Really, to hold in abeyance is more easy to say.
    Is it just the common tendency now? In many english dictionaries it is said to use "be/fall in abeyance". It isn't used now in English in such a phase, is it?
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    To be fair, I think Alacer's question was, is the phrase "to be in abeyance of something" used in everyday English - which I think, in this context, it can be.

    I agree with dimcl about "to the necessary extent" (I decided to dodge that one!), and about splitting into two sentences. I have made an alternative suggestion involving "creating".

    Personally, I don't have a strong objection to nowadays (we don't know, of course, the extent to which this text is formal (although, clearly, it's not an email to a friend!)).
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Thank you very much! I see now... Really, to hold in abeyance is more easy to say.
    Is it just the common tendency now? In many english dictionaries it is said to use "be/fall in abeyance". It isn't used now in English in such a phase, is it?
    "To be/fall in abeyance" (or into abeyance, which I prefer) is also regularly used BUT not as you have done. You could say the process is in abeyance, or has fallen into abeyance, but NOT of something else. If you wanted, you could say A is in abeyance because of B, that would work
     

    Alacer

    Senior Member
    Russia, Russian
    Yea, the extent to which this text is formal is almost maximum..
    I wonder whether you use the phrase "to the necessery extent" or not.
    Should I create a new thread where I will write this question or would you be so kind as to answer, please? If you don't use it, what do you prefer?
     

    Alacer

    Senior Member
    Russia, Russian
    I read one of the examples in dictionary and it says the following: "in the abeyance of the Cathedral services" (waiting for the Cathedral service)
    It is incorrect, is it?
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I wonder whether you use the phrase "to the necessery extent" or not.
    Should I create a new thread where I will write this question or would you be so kind as to answer, please? If you don't use it, what do you prefer?
    Alacer, I have sent you a PM about this
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I read one of the examples in dictionary and it says the following: "in the abeyance of the Cathedral services" (waiting for the Cathedral service)
    It is incorrect, is it?
    Personally, I don't recognise this definition of "abeyance". "Abeyance" generally means something like "temporarily suspended", not "waiting for". Cathedral services might be in abeyance (for example, because the roof of the cathedral is in a dangerous condition, or because a new bishop has yet to be appointed) and therefore I suppose people might be waiting for cathedral services to recommence, but that idea is not intrinsic to the meaning of "abeyance".
     
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