be standing/by/near/close to

yakor

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.
If the person near the store is waiting someone, could one say about him:
-The person is standing by the store.
Is the preposition "by" is OK here, Or better to use the other preposition?
 
  • yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks.
    Which is better to say
    --The person is standing by the store.
    -The person is standing near the store.
    -The person is standing close to the store. (I mean which preposition is better after "standing")
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Ordinarily I'd say
    "I'm standing by the store" (but not "I'm standing close to the store") if I'm within 25 (or so) feet of it. I might also say "I'm standing next to the store."
    "I'm standing near the store" means I'm in the vicinity of the store but not as close as 'by' or 'next to.'
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Ordinarily I'd say
    "I'm standing by the store" (but not "I'm standing close to the store") if I'm within 25 (or so) feet of it. I might also say "I'm standing next to the store."
    "I'm standing near the store" means I'm in the vicinity of the store but not as close as 'by' or 'next to.'
    "close to"="near"
    by=next to?
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I would use
    'by' to mean 'next to'
    but I wouldn't say 'I'm standing close to the store.' If the distance between me and the store were longer than the distance that is meant in 'next to' or 'by,' I'd use 'near.'
     

    Gergedan Cemil

    Member
    Turkish
    Ordinarily I'd say
    "I'm standing by the store" (but not "I'm standing close to the store") if I'm within 25 (or so) feet of it. I might also say "I'm standing next to the store."
    "I'm standing near the store" means I'm in the vicinity of the store but not as close as 'by' or 'next to.'
    More shortly, could we also say "I'm by the store" or "I'm next to the store"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The phrase “standing by the store” sounds odd to me — outside the store, as suggested by heypresto, would be much more idiomatic. In my experience, the preposition by is more commonly used when making an arrangement (Meet me by the bus stop, I’ll meet you by the gates, etc.); and “standing by” is used mainly in relation to things rather than whole buildings, e.g. He’s standing over there, by the checkouts / by the car / by the exit.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    and “standing by” is used mainly in relation to things rather than whole buildings, e.g. He’s standing over there, by the checkouts / by the car / by the exit.
    Because the whole building or wood is too large to be by them. But "to walk by them"="to walk past them" is OK.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. But walking by (past) something and standing by (next to) something are different meanings. It’s also perfectly OK to say you’re standing by the Statue of Liberty or the Taj Mahal, for example, but in my experience the word is more often used to mean standing by something much smaller.
     
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