be subject to / be subjected to

Tourmaline

Senior Member
Hello ;)

Simply, I want to know whether these two sentences could be translated same..

1) The nation is subject to another nation.
2) The nation is subjected to another nation.

I think both of them could be translated as
''the nation' is under the dominion of 'another nation'.'

Is it correct?
If it's wrong, please tell me the differences between the two.

Thank you all ;)
 
  • armour65

    Senior Member
    United States English
    Sorry, i really don't understand your examples. In thinking of others by myself, it would appear you are correct, "subject to" and "subjected to" are identical in meaning but are just used for different nouns. For example.

    A person may be "subjected" to something (He was subjected to cruel and unusual punishment)
    For the most part, all other things may be "subject to" something else...I don't know why but to say "John was subject to cruel and unusual punishment" just seems incomplete to me. It doesn't "ring true" like the first example.

    In meaning, they both convey the idea of not necessarily being dominated by but rather being exposed to, being susceptible to, or not having the ability to stop something from happening (ie. A nation which is subject to violence may have a poorly skilled police force, or for whatever reason, has difficulty in suppressing the violence)

    Hope this helps.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Member Emeritus
    English - England
    Hello ;)

    Simply, I want to know whether these two sentences could be translated same..

    1) The nation is subject to another nation.
    2) The nation is subjected to another nation.

    I think both of them could be translated as
    ''the nation' is under the dominion of 'another nation'.'

    Is it correct?
    If it's wrong, please tell me the differences between the two.

    Thank you all ;)
    1. is fine and has the meaning which you describe.

    2. doesn't work because to be subjected to means something very different from to be subject to. To be subjected to means to be caused to suffer. One nation doesn't suffer another nation very obviously. One suffers mistreatment or cruelty, say - you were subjected to mistreatment or cruelty. You could say the nation suffered the domination of another nation, but that would be much better expressed by your first sentence.
     

    uhandai

    New Member
    English
    The first example is awkward!!! You can't say "one nation is subject to another nation". The most frequent words following 'subject to" are as follows according to a corpus-based investigation.
    屏幕快照 2013-08-27 p.m.04.18.55.jpg
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Member Emeritus
    English - England
    The first example is awkward!!! You can't say "one nation is subject to another nation". The most frequent words following 'subject to" are as follows according to a corpus-based investigation.
    Here I must disagree. We can and do say 'one nation is subject to another'.

    Here are some examples:

    While America was subject to Great Britain, I never heard that any national infringement of the personal liberty of the colonial inhabitant was complained of etc.
    (A Letter to Theobald McKenna, Esq. occasioned by a publication, entitled A memoire on some questions respecting the projected Union) by John Hamilton.

    Southern Etruria became subject to Rome, with the capture of Nepi and Sutri in 386. History of Rome - Catholic Encyclopedia
     
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