be up on somebody/something

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anewuser

New Member
Hungary - Hungarian
Hello!

I'm playing with a video game, and I stumbled upon the following sentence:

"Luckily I'm up on my Shakespeare, or I wouldn't have noticed this book about witches!"

Would somebody please explain the meaning of "I'm up on my ..." slang/phrase?

thank you very much
 
  • cutiepie1892

    Senior Member
    Northern Ireland English
    It's quite a common phrase. It just means that you are knowledgable about something, in this case the works of Shakespeare.
     

    Black Sheep

    Member
    England, English
    Hello!

    I'm playing with a video game, and I stumbled upon the following sentence:

    "Luckily I'm up on my Shakespeare, or I wouldn't have noticed this book about witches!"

    Would somebody please explain the meaning of "I'm up on my ..." slang/phrase?

    thank you very much
    Welcome to the forums, anewuser,

    Here "I'm up on my Shakespeare" means that the person is well acquainted with Shakespeare's works. 'The book about witches' is linked to 'The Scottish Play" - Mac***h. We consider it unlucky to mention it by its full name.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    These are accepted forms of 'somebody' or 'something'. Whether or not they are acceptable to this formal forum I don't know.
    Accepted by whom? When was the last time you saw one native speaker, writing for other native speakers in normal writing, use them? And as it so happens, they are not considered acceptable for this forum. I am delighted to see that the original poster has corrected them to something that is generally intelligible.

    Now that the question can be understood, to be "up on" something is to be familiar with it and in a position to use the knowledge one has.

    "Up in", which is an old variant, appears in Ko-Ko's song in Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado, where among the people who "never would be missed" he lists
    All children who are up in dates, and floor you with 'em flat--
    that is, "children who have studied history so well that they are able to talk about the dates that events happened in a way that astonishes adults."

    When one is not "up on" something, the way to become "up on" the information is to "brush up on" it:

    Since I have forgotten what Macbeth is about, I need to brush up on my Shakespeare.
     

    willibald

    New Member
    swedish
    Accepted by whom? When was the last time you saw one native speaker, writing for other native speakers in normal writing, use them? And as it so happens, they are not considered acceptable for this forum. I am delighted to see that the original poster has corrected them to something that is generally intelligible.

    Now that the question can be understood, to be "up on" something is to be familiar with it and in a position to use the knowledge one has.

    "Up in", which is an old variant, appears in Ko-Ko's song in Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado, where among the people who "never would be missed" he lists

    that is, "children who have studied history so well that they are able to talk about the dates that events happened in a way that astonishes adults."

    When one is not "up on" something, the way to become "up on" the information is to "brush up on" it:

    Since I have forgotten what Macbeth is about, I need to brush up on my Shakespeare.
    Well, thanks for that one! I was just looking all over the internet for the meaning of that particular line in Ko-Ko's song.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Can I say "I'm not up on the latest development of the event" with the meaning "I'm not up to dated with the latest development of the event"?
     
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