be used to/get used to

Arthur Korablyov

Senior Member
Russian
Hello! I have a question for you.

Do these sentences mean the same:

I am used to eating bananas and I've got (become) used to eating bananas ?

But at the same time, if I am not mistaken, the next sentences are different:

I wasn't used to eating rice. But then I got used to it.

Why so? Or maybe I am not right. Please, clear it up for me. And thank you in advance!
 
  • djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    To be used to doing something is to be habituated to doing it. One can become habituated or used to anything. It is quite frequent that food once disliked or even abhorred becomes liked with more practice. I used to dislike tomatoes now I am used to them and I like them. Thus I wasn't used to eating rice. But then I got used to it is a perfectly normal thing to say.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I wasn't used to eating bananas.
    This sentence is about my feelings of the past.

    I got/became used to eating bananas.
    This sentence is about a change in my feelings of the past.

    I am used to eating bananas.
    This sentence is about my feelings in the present.

    I've gotten/become used to eating bananas.
    This sentence is about a completed change in my feelings from past to present.
     

    Arthur Korablyov

    Senior Member
    Russian
    So, what's the difference between I used to smoke and I was used to smoking. Can I say I was used to smoking if I am talking about my habit in the past?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    So, what's the difference between I used to smoke and I was used to smoking. Can I say I was used to smoking if I am talking about my habit in the past?
    "I was used to smoking" means I did not feel uncomfortable smoking and probably felt uncomfortable except when smoking.
    "I used to smoke" means I smoked in the past, probably on more than one occasion.

    You might say they both talk about habits, but "was used to" refers to comfort, tolerance, adjustment, etc., whereas "used to" without "was" mainly points out that the action was in the past and secondarily suggests it happened more than once.
     
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