beaming... and scattered

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Kathy Nguyen

Senior Member
Vietnam
I intend to write this sentence as an example of a personification but I'm not sure about its structure.
"The old Sun gradually emerged from the horizontal line, beaming delightedly and scattered golden sunshine on the Earth."
The thing is although "beaming delightedly" sounds more fluent than "beamed delightedly" to me but I'm not sure if it's correct or not.
Also, I used to post a question about a sentence using a participle clause which is similar to the above one and it's accepted, so if the above one is wrong grammatically, may you please give me the reason why as well as the difference between two of them? Thank you so much!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You need some parallelism, like this:

    "The old Sun gradually emerged from the horizontal line, beaming delightedly and scattering golden sunshine on the Earth."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Either is fine; you just don't want "beaming, scattered" or "beaming, scattered" – in my opinion.

    Looking over your sentence again, I see that a comma would allow for "beaming, scattered," like this:

    "The old Sun gradually emerged from the horizontal line, beaming delightedly[,] and scattered golden sunshine on the Earth."
     

    CodaCoder

    New Member
    English
    "The old Sun gradually emerged from the horizontal line, beaming delightfully, scattering golden sunshine on the Earth."

    Because the Sun cannot express (and indeed does not possess) "feelings". Being delighted is a state of being, surely?

    Just my take.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Because the Sun cannot express (and indeed does not possess) "feelings".
    It can in fiction. As the OP said ...
    I intend to write this sentence as an example of a personification ...
    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English: personification: n.1. the attribution of a personal nature or character to inanimate objects or abstract notions, esp. as a rhetorical figure.
     
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