bear hidden trouble

danielxu85

Senior Member
Mandarin Chinese
I think you could "have troubles", but could you "bear hidden troubles"? Does that make sense? I think the author tries to express the idea that China might foot the bill for the troubles which has not materialized, but will appear in the future. (that's too long. Any succinct expression?)

Mr. Gao pointed out that the economic development of China in 2007 bears the following hidden troubles.
 
  • GuitarMaestro

    Senior Member
    USA English
    it is OK as is, because it is being used as a contraction of "bears the burden of" hidden troubles. But don't use it by itself, you probably wouldn't just say "He bears hidden troubles, " it would be understood, but it's a sentence fragment.
     

    danielxu85

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    Thanks, Maestro! One point I am not sure: you said "He bears hidden troubles" is just a sentence fragment, then, how do you make it into a complete sentence? Is "potential troubles" better than "hidden troubles"?
     

    GuitarMaestro

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Daniel:

    It's actually OK, but it would have to be surrounded by some kind of context, for example, if you were talking about someone who was very depressed, or missed a lot of work, you could respond by saying, "Well, he bears some hidden troubles." If I just walked up to you, pointed to someone and said,"He bears hidden troubles," well, that would be a pretty strange thing to say. "Bears hidden troubles" is pretty colloquial, and I would probably just say something less formal in any case, such as, ""Well, maybe he is dealing with some personal problems right now."
     
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