beat around the bush/beat about the bush

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volver

Senior Member
french belgium
Hello,


If I said something that for you seem that I should have said then say it and don't beat around the bush.


Does my sentence make sense?
Can you please correct it, if need be.

Thank you

VOLVER
 
  • Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Unfortunately, the sentence doesn't make too much sense.

    How about: If I kept saying things that purposely avoided the point of the discussion, then you would tell me not to beat around the bush.
     

    WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    Hello,


    If I said something that for you seem that I should have said then say it and don't beat around the bush.


    Does my sentence make sense?
    Can you please correct it, if need be.

    Thank you

    VOLVER
    Tell me if this is what you want to say, Volver:

    If you think I should have said something, then don't beat around the bush and just tell me.
     

    rainbow84uk

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    If I said something that for you seem that I should have said then say it and don't beat around the bush.
    I'm not exactly sure what you wanted to say here. Did you mean 'should', or 'shouldn't'? I can imagine a sentence with shouldn't:

    "If I said something that you think I shouldn't have (said), don't beat around the bush; tell me so."
     

    volver

    Senior Member
    french belgium
    Sorry, I meant shouldn't have said.

    She was irate because I might have said something that I shouldn't have said. She doesn't tell why? She only gave me some hints so that's why I said don't beat around the bush.

    What would you say ?

    Thank you

    VOLVER
     

    anjing-laowai

    New Member
    French - Belgium
    Hi, I was wondering if "around" and "about" could both be used alternatively in the phrase "beat around/about the bush", because I found both and I don't know which of the two is actually correct (or if they both are).
     

    jonjonsin

    Member
    English - American
    My preference would be "beat around the bush." I bet some people know it the other way. I don't know which one is correct, but I don't really believe that idioms have a correct way to start with.
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    Hi, I was wondering if "around" and "about" could both be used alternatively in the phrase "beat around/about the bush", because I found both and I don't know which of the two is actually correct (or if they both are).
    They are very similar semantically so I suppose both would communicate the meaning of the phrase, which is figurative rather than literal. However, 'about' is more commonly heard (in England at least). I think this may be because it adds to the alliterated 'b' sound in 'beat' and 'bush'. It trips off the tongue quite neatly.
     

    anjing-laowai

    New Member
    French - Belgium
    Thanks, I guess it's all a matter of where you are really. As you aid, idioms tends to change a place from places to places, depending on people's habits and all. So thank you anyway for answering ;)
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    Does anyone know the origin of this idiom? Some mediaeval custom, or what?
     

    THE-GULP

    Senior Member
    Sumoi
    hi ,

    " beat about the bush "

    I came across this idiom ,and then I looked it up in Google which gave me

    many results ,thus it's a common idiom to use in the Internet , :)

    Do you tend to use when you talk ? do you hear it often ?

    Thanks guys.
     
    Last edited:

    BellaDancer

    Senior Member
    "Beating about the bush" and "beating around the bush" are in very common use. In the US, "beating around the bush" is probably heard more.

    "He kept beating around the bush and not getting to the point."

    "Stop beating around the bush and ask her out already!"
     
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