<Beat (up)> and <get beaten (up)>

A-friend

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
Hello everyone

Beat up as a transitive verb means: "to give a severe beating to, etc."

Example: I got beaten up by thugs on my way home.

Also, Cambridge says:

Beat up: to hurt someone badly by hitting or kicking them repeatedly:

Example: He claims he was beaten up by the police.

Now, let's say a guy is bothering a bully who doesn't tend to fight that guy. He just wants to warn and threaten that person to go away, otherwise he would beat them (up) severely.

Which one of the following sentences would indicate the message that the bully needs to convey to the annoying guy:

In active form:

1-1- Get out of here, or I'll beat you.
1-2- Get out of here, or I'll beat you up.
1-3- Get out of here, or I'll beat you up badly. (meaning more severely)

And in passive form:

2-1- Get out of here, or you'll get beaten.
2-2- Get out of here, or you'll get beaten up.
2-3- Get out of here, or you'll get beaten up badly. (meaning more severely)

I think all sentences are completely natural. But I had to inquire about it.

Many thanks in advance.
 
  • A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    "Get out of here, or I'll beat you up. "

    The passive sentences are not natural.

    And, you don't need to add "badly."
    Thank you, but I need much more explanation. Your definition is a bit vague!
    Fir exame, I need to know:
    How can I amplify the meaning of "beat up"?
    Do you mean that "beat up" by itself is very severe?
    If so, what shall I say instead where I don't need to add to the severity of the meaning?
    Why "beat" on its own doesn't work in this sense?
    Would it sound archaic in this sense?
    Would it be ambiguous because it has a meaning of overcoming a rival or a competitor?
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    If you really want to sound threatening, any use of "beat up" will be inadequate for the situation. It just doesn't sound threatening enough.
    Thank you sound shift; actually it is not a matter of grammar, scenario or something else. It is a matter of the semantic nuance between these two verbs in passive and in active forms.

    I mean I need to know how these verbs differ in meaning:

    1) Beat someone
    2) Beat someone up

    and, I made the scenario to define which one of the choices below involve "redundancy" by the adverb "badly":

    1) Beat someone badly
    2) Beat someone up badly

    The same goes for the passive form:

    1) Beaten badly (by someone)
    2) Beaetn up badly (by someone)

    Now, just to avoid making another story, regardless of whether I was going to be threatening or not, please let me know how these combinations work semantically?

    I think that "beat" by itself and without the preposition "up" doesn't work in this sense (as an aggrassive attack towards someone including hitting them) and it would be a little archaic in that sense.
    To me "beating someone / a team" only works in the meaning of "winning them" in a match/game.

    Although, if you need, I would try to create another scenario. :)
     
    Last edited:

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The meaning of "beaten" (without up) depends on context.
    Saracens beat Exeter - the result of a rugby match, and sadly true.
    He beat his dog - he hit the dog, perhaps with a stick.
    The headmaster beat the unruly pupil - with a cane, but now an illegal punishment.

    Get out of here or I'll beat you - I have a big stick in my hand (a valid usage, but I'd be surprised to hear it).
    Get out of here or I'll beat you up. To which the traditional reply is "Ha, you and whose army!"

    I'll beat you badly - :confused: If you are going to do it badly, why bother starting?

    If you want to intensify beaten up:
    He was badly beaten up - his injuries were severe.
    He was beaten up badly - the thug was incompetent and didn't cause as much damage as might be expected.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think there's any way that an English speaker would try to intensify these threats, other than by changing the verb.
    Get out of here or I'll kill you.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    I don't think there's any way that an English speaker would try to intensify these threats, other than by changing the verb.
    Get out of here or I'll kill you.
    Ok; :) then please let me know how in the following sentence we can intensify, but in we are unable to do the same in the respetive active form sentence:

    If you want to intensify beaten up:
    He was badly beaten up - his injuries were severe.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    In that "beaten up" functions as an adjective, so it can be modified in degree - badly beaten up, severely beaten up, terribly beaten up.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top