"Beatle song" or "Beatles song"

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JingleEagle

Senior Member
French
Beatle song or Beatles song, Beatle concert or Beatles concert ??

I can find both in the web searches but probably "Beatles song" more often.
However, John Lennon in a Playboy interview said: "Everyone talks in terms of the last record or the last Beatle concert... "
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Beatle song/concert - The group were so popular that their name became an adjective and was not inflected - you could have a "Beatle haircut."
    Beatles song/concert -> Beatles is a noun acting as an adjective, = A song/concert associated with the Beatles.
    Beatles' song/concert -> Correct genitive of Beatles -> a song of concert of The Beatles.

    So as the saying goes, "You pays your money and you takes your choice." :D
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    John Lennon, being a Beatle, can say what he wants, but I think the rest of us* are more likely to say 'Beatles song/record/concert'.

    * Well, most people. I personally wouldn't say the word. Apart from saying 'I can't stand the Beatles'. :))

    Cross-posted.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's the same with the Rolling Stones, the New Faces, the Manic Street Preachers . . .

    In fact, I'd hazard a guess that it applies to any band that has a plural for a name.

    A (Rolling) Stone concert. :confused:
    A Manic album. :confused:
    A Face record. :confused:
     

    JingleEagle

    Senior Member
    French
    Thanks to everyone, I can imagine the Beatles were everywhere, also toys and various things, the sixties were so beatle-ish that it became an adjective. This is what I retain from your comments. Thank you all! :)
     
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