because of the bad weather vs because of the weather being so bad

raizo244

New Member
Vietnamese
Hi, everyone!

I'd like to ask you guys if there is a difference in the meaning between these examples:

1. We couldn't see the top of the mountain because of the weather being so bad.
2. We couldn't see the top of the mountain because of the bad weather.

The context for these examples comes from a letter of complaint. I tend to use (2) more because it's more concise but the answer key in my textbook is (1). I don't think I'm wrong because "because of" can be followed by a noun or gerund. But the answer keys are always (1) and I don't know why. If I'm not wrong, when do we use (1) and when do we use (2).

Thank you!
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Both sentences are correct. Sentence (1) makes readers think of worse weather than sentence (2), but there isn't really much difference between them, and both versions are used.

    Edit: I see that your thread title uses "despite of". This is wrong, and I cannot see how "despite" fits the situation. Is it "despite" or "because of" that you are asking about?
     

    raizo244

    New Member
    Vietnamese
    Edit: I see that your thread title uses "despite of". This is wrong, and I cannot see how "despite" fits the situation. Is it "despite" or "because of" that you are asking about?
    Ah, it's a typing mistake. I was going to type "because of" while thinking about "despite/in spite of". Thanks for pointing that out to me.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree. They are both fine and there is not much difference.

    1 sounds more conversational to me. It has more words than you really need but sounds like how people really talk.
     
    Top