because the ball has or is punctured.

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  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    The ball is punctured.
    The ball has a hole in it.


    I think you could also say "The ball is broken".
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Not necessarily. Cricket bats and baseball bats aren't brittle but they can break, to give you just two examples. And the word "break" can be used to refer to non-tangible things, so why not tennis balls?
    When a bat breaks, it has a large crack in it or even falls apart into multiple pieces. With simple physical objects, "break" doesn't mean "cease to function" but "break into multiple pieces."
    The ball with a tiny hole in it is basically still whole.
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    When a bat breaks, it has a large crack in it or even falls apart into multiple pieces. With simple physical objects, "break" doesn't mean "cease to function" but "break into multiple pieces."
    The ball with a tiny hole in it is basically still whole.
    Why shouldn't I use " has" The ball has punctured. Shouldn't I say break, If the ball is not bouncing as much as it normally does.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Shouldn't I say break,
    I think you can, though it seems not everyone agrees.

    Another quote for you, this time from the United States Tennis Association website: If a ball breaks during a point (not just a soft ball but a ball that breaks and now has no pressure) then that ball should be replaced and a let should be played...If it is discovered that the ball is soft but not broken, that ball should be replaced however the point stands.

    Balls | USTA
     
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