become extinct v. die out

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
"Woolly mammoths became extinct ,or died out ,between 10 000 and 20000 years ago.but some animals were around until much more recent times."


I would like to ask what is the difference between "die out" and "become extinct" ?

Source:"On the Edge of Extinction


Thank you.
 
  • hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    There's no real difference. The author has added 'or died out' to explain to his or her young readers in simple language what 'became extinct' means.
    Do you mean that by using both, the author aims that these verbs explains each other? Is this a rule to teach something or language? If so, what is the name of it?

    Thank you.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No, it's not a rule.

    It just seems that the author wanted to give a simple English word that a young reader might already know, as an alternative to a scientific word that the reader might not know. Now the author's done that, he or she can use the word 'extinction' throughout the rest of the book.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No, it's not a rule.

    It just seems that the author wanted to give a simple English word that a young reader might already know, as an alternative to a scientific word that the reader might not know. Now the author's done that, he or she can use the word 'extinction' throughout the rest of the book.
    This means "die out" is an simple and everyday word, but extinction not, don't they? Extinction is more belonged to scientific language than everyday language, doesn't it?

    Thank you.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Do you mean that by using both, the author aims that these verbs explains each other? Is this a rule to teach something or language? If so, what is the name of it?
    A "parenthetical (clause)" is a clause inserted in the middle of a sentence. The sentence is complete without the parenthetical. The parenthetical is separated from the sentence with "(" and ")" or with commas. The parenthetical adds information about whatever is just before it. For example:

    "Mr Roberts (a well-known drunk) swears he was sober that night."
    "Mr Roberts, a well-known drunk, swears he was sober that night."

    The wooly mammoth sentence consists of these parts:

    main sentence: "Woolly mammoths became extinct between 10 000 and 20000 years ago."

    parenthetical: "(or died out)"

    Here "or died out" adds information about "became extinct", the phrase just before it. The information given by "or died out" is that "died out" is another way of saying "became extinct".
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The sentence is complete without the parenthetical. The parenthetical is separated from the sentence with "(" and ")" or with commas. The parenthetical adds information about whatever is just before it..
    This explanation is complex to understand. Is it with "and" or with commas?

    Thank you.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    This explanation is complex to understand. Is it with "and" or with commas?.
    doibear gave you an example of what he was saying:

    "Mr Roberts (a well-known drunk) swears he was sober that night."
    "Mr Roberts, a well-known drunk, swears he was sober that night."

    The parenthetical expression is this:

    a well-known drunk


    In the first sentence, it is set off with parentheses: ( ... )

    In the second, it is set off with commas. , ... ,
     
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