Become + noun + with (she became a drill ship with Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve)

Flogger20

Senior Member
Persian, Iran
Hello,

I guess [Become + Noun + With] is a pattern in English. would you please tell me what does the following text try to say?

After service in the Mediterranean, in 1938 she became a drill ship with Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) and then the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR).
[[ Second question deleted. ]]

Regards.
 
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  • SReynolds

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    This is the same with as the one in I'm with the NYPD.

    [[...]]
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The use of "become" here is normal English. It describes a change of state. He was a baby, then he became a boy, then he became a man, then he became a father, then he became a grandfather. The ship was in active service as a warship, then it became a training (drill) ship. There is nothing special about "become a drill ship with the RNVR". That (become - noun - with) isn't a particular pattern, "with the RNVR" is an adjectival phrase modifying "drill ship". She became a drill ship - what sort of drill ship? - a drill ship with the RNVR.

    The use of "After service" is a separate question. You might like to start a new thread if you cannot find an existing one.
     

    Flogger20

    Senior Member
    Persian, Iran
    The use of "become" here is normal English. It describes a change of state. He was a baby, then he became a boy, then he became a man, then he became a father, then he became a grandfather. The ship was in active service as a warship, then it became a training (drill) ship. There is nothing special about "become a drill ship with the RNVR". That (become - noun - with) isn't a particular pattern, "with the RNVR" is an adjectival phrase modifying "drill ship". She became a drill ship - what sort of drill ship? - a drill ship with the RNVR.

    The use of "After service" is a separate question. You might like to start a new thread if you cannot find an existing one.
    Can I say "She became a drill ship for RNVR?" and how about using parallel structure as follows:

    She became a drill ship with/for the RNVR and then with/for the RNR.
    [[ One topic per thread please. Your second question has been removed. ]]
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There are many contexts in which you could say "she became a {noun} for the {organization}". It would be grammatical but not idiomatic in this context: ships serve "with" the Navy, so the correct collocation here is "with the RNVR" and "with the RNR".
     

    Flogger20

    Senior Member
    Persian, Iran
    Thank you so much Andygc for guiding me ♥

    My last question is about parallel structure. I don't know that is it compulsory to use "with" after "after then" or not! I mean in the original sentence "with" it has not been used after "after then" but is it correct to use it like the following form?


    After service in the Mediterranean, in 1938 she became a drill ship with Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) and then with the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR).
     
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