become proud of what you build/built

keilah_5

Senior Member
Spanish - Spain
Hi guys. I think that there's something wrong with "Once you're done with the structure you had in mind, you become very proud of what you build" shouldn't it be "built"? The context of the sentence is written below.

"I love lego. It makes me feel like a child again. It’s fun to play with as it gives me a physical version of my concrete ideas. Once you’re done with the structure you had in mind, you become very proud of what you build"



 
  • keilah_5

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    "Build" is fine here. It is simple present and suggests that I regularly build things with lego.

    I am not clear what "you're done with the structure you had in mind" means.
    Once you're done with the lego structure you had in mind (you had previously planned, thought about)
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would have said 'built' here. After you have finished building the structure, you are proud of what you have built.

    (Note Lego, being a proper noun, should be capitalised.)
     

    keilah_5

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    You have made a valiant attempt to make some sense of part of this sentence, but "you're done with" seems to have defeated you! Me too.
    oh I understand. So how would the sentence be in order to make sense?
     
    Last edited:

    keilah_5

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    See heypresto's post #4. :thumbsup:
    "I love lego. It makes me feel like a child again. It’s fun to play with as it gives me a physical version of my concrete ideas. Once you've finished building the structure you had in mind, you are very proud of what you built" - like this?
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I was thinking of something more like Once you have forgotten your illusion that Lego is only for children, you become very proud of what you build. This illusion is a mental structure.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top