Before Dawn came along

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
"Before Dawn came along, I had a very small family. Two people. My dad and me"

Context: The speaker's father married Dawn mother. Probably the two families joint.

Would you please explain "came along"?

Thanks and regards. I don't think it means "appear".

Source: The Babysitters Club 52.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Thanks and regards. I don't think it means "appear".
    It means "Before Dawn became a member of my family, I had a very small family." Because Dawn appears to be the speaker's stepmother, "came along" sounds slightly unusual to me. Parents sometimes talk of their children "coming along" when they refer to the children being born and becoming members of the family.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Before Dawn came along, I had a very small family. Two people. My dad and me"

    Context: The speaker's father married Dawn mother. Probably the two families joint.

    Would you please explain "came along"?

    Thanks and regards. I don't think it means "appear".

    Source: The Babysitters Club 52.
    I'm a little confused by the word "mother" in your context sentence.
    I think you must mean that the speaker's father married Dawn.
    I understand "Before Dawn came along" to mean "before Dawn entered our lives" or "before Dawn appeared in our lives."
    The use of "to come along" sounds perfectly normal to me.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I'm sorry. I had a typo. Would you please judge it again?

    "Before Dawn came along, I had a very small family. Two people. My dad and me"

    Context: The speaker's father married Dawn's mother. Probably the two families joint.

    Would you please explain "came along"?

    Thanks and regards. I don't think it means "appear".

    Source: The Babysitters Club 52.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    "Before Dawn came along, I had a very small family. Two people. My dad and me"

    Context: The speaker's father married Dawn's mother. Probably the two families joint.

    Would you please explain "came along"?

    Thanks and regards. I don't think it means "appear".

    Source: The Babysitters Club 52.
    It would have helped had you given us the full context for this which is that she (the heroine of the story) starts off by saying that she was already best friends with Dawn, when her father married Dawn's mother, with the result that they became step-sisters.

    The next paragraph is in the form of a flashback in which there were just of them: she and her widowed father. Then Dawn's family moved in next door. So here, "before Dawn came along" means before Dawn arrived [next door] and subsequently became part of the family. :)
     
    Last edited:

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    It would have helped had you given us the full context for this which is that she (the heroine of the story) starts off by saying that she was already best friends with Dawn, when her father married Dawn's mother, with the result that they became step-sisters.

    The next paragraph is in the form of a flashback in which there were just of them: she and her widowed father. Then Dawn's family moved in next door. So here, "before Dawn came along" means before Dawn arrived [next door] and subsequently became part of the family. :)
    I'm at the beginning of the book but I don't now if Dawn arried next door. I guess they moved their house. Here is the source. I hope it works.

    The Baby-Sitters Club #52: Mary Anne + 2 Many Babies
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Oh, I'm sorry: you're right, it doesn't say "next door". :oops:

    Dawn and her family just moved into the same town, so that's how they initially became friends.
    So here, "before Dawn came along" means before Dawn arrived [next door] and subsequently became part of the family. :)
    So does "came along" mean before Dawn arrived [the town] and subsequently became part of the family?
     
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