Before <he joined> <joining>

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forgoodorill

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, everyone!
I saw two sentences in a grammar book:

Before he joined the Navy, Gerald made peace with his family.
Before joining the Navy, Gerald made peace with his family.

So what's the difference between them, and what's the second sentence 'joining' denotes?

Thanks in advance!:)
 
  • forgoodorill

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    One is a finite clause (with subject and verb); the other is a non-finite clause (with gerund-participle).
    Thanks, lingobingo.
    But I still wonder what is the 'gerund-participle'.
    I looked it up on the Internet. But only has gerund and participle partly. Is it means as a function of participle, adjective, but the form is gerund?
    But I found one website said they both are same form. So could you explain this to me?
    Thanks!
    Source: What's the difference between a gerund and a participle?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s complicated. I don’t normally use the term gerund-participle myself, but it’s preferred by those who would like to do away with the distinction, while others just call them all -ing words. Both terms are handy when it’s not entirely clear whether a word is being used as a present participle or a gerund! ;)
     

    forgoodorill

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It’s complicated. I don’t normally use the term gerund-participle myself, but it’s preferred by those who would like to do away with the distinction, while others just call them all -ing words. Both terms are handy when it’s not entirely clear whether a word is being used as a present participle or a gerund! ;)
    Thanks, lingobingo! :) :thumbsup:
     
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