before sleep or before going to bed?

Garbuz

Senior Member
Russian
She likes to have a glass of milk before sleep/going to bed.

Frankly speaking, I don't like either of them. But can't think of a better phrase. Would you help?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Help with what? There's nothing at all wrong with before going to bed. (before sleep doesn't work at all for me.)
     

    temple09

    Senior Member
    English - British
    but if she is on bed and trying to sleep, what we can say? Before sleep or before going to bed?
    I don't really understand what you mean. "Going to bed" means that they are going to get into their bed and try to sleep. So you say "She likes to have a glass of milk before going to bed". She's not exactly going to "like" being in bed, being unable to sleep and then (whilst lying down with her eyes shut) drink milk, is she? Besides, the "before sleep" option would not be said in this way.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    She likes to have a glass of milk before sleeping.
    She likes to have a glass of milk before going to bed.

    Their meanings are slightly different.

    I can easily fall asleep in front of my PC... Especially when I am Wordreferencing and I have just had a glass of warm milk... :D

    GF..

    There is also "She likes to have a glass of milk before having a sleep." ... There are a few more..
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    There are two scenarios. "She likes to have a glass of milk before going to bed" - she pours a glass of milk, drinks it and then goes to bed. "She likes to have a glass of milk before going to sleep" - She has some milk beside the bed, reads or watches the television in bed, when she is tired she drinks the milk and goes to sleep. Many people do not sleep immediately they go to bed.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You will also hear, at least in American English:
    She likes to have a glass of milk before bed.
    She likes to have a glass of mile before bedtime.


    But "She likes to have a glass of milk before going to bed" is just fine.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    You could also say, "She has a glass of milk at bedtime to help her sleep."

    The "helps him/her/me/you sleep" is a very common way of saying this in AE.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    You will also hear, at least in American English:
    She likes to have a glass of milk before bed.
    She likes to have a glass of mile before bedtime.


    But "She likes to have a glass of milk before going to bed" is just fine.
    Is there anything wrong with saying: "I like having a snack of fruit before bed."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Is there anything wrong with saying: "I like having a snack of fruit before bed."
    Other than the fact that "snack of fruit" makes me spit my milk, no.* :D

    *(Sorry, I've just never heard it before and the sound of it seems quite hilarious at the moment, although there's probably nothing wrong with it ... just with me.)
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Just to be weird... I actually like (indeed need, but for reasons I won't go into) to have a glass of milk while in bed, before going to sleep. I then brush my teeth, in bed, and read until I start to nod off (don't ask!) Nevertheless, I don't think I'd say I "like to have a glass of milk before sleep". That sounds a bit odd. I'd probably have to go into detail and describe the situation as I have in my first sentence.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Other than the fact that "snack of fruit" makes me spit my milk, no.* :D

    *(Sorry, I've just never heard it before and the sound of it seems quite hilarious at the moment, although there's probably nothing wrong with it ... just with me.)
    Thank you, Copyright. I like having a snack = I enjoy it. I like to have a snack = I do it habitually.
     

    sunnyweather

    Senior Member
    Polish
    And how about:

    I always read a book before going to bed. (Would this sentence imply I read a book before I go to bed?)

    I always read a book before going to sleep. (Would it imply I like to read in bed?)

    Would it be possible to say: I always read a book before sleep.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I always read a book before going to bed. (Would this sentence imply I read a book before I go to bed?)

    I always read a book before going to sleep. (Would it imply I like to read in bed?)
    They both imply that you read a whole book.

    Try:
    I always read before going to bed.
    I always have a read before going to bed.*
    I always have a read before I go to bed.*
    ---------------------
    I always read in bed before I go to sleep.
    I always have a read in bed before going to sleep.*


    *I think this is BrE only ... not sure.
     

    sunnyweather

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you for your comments. 'Does I read a book before going to bed.' really mean I read the whole book? What about 'I read (some) books before going to bed.' Would it imply I read several books from cover to cover?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No one would say that. It implies that you read several books on the same evening.

    I’m not familiar with “have a read” either. It’s very informal. Ewie’s unstarred suggestions are by far the most common:

    I always read before going to bed.
    I always read in bed before I go to sleep.

    Or: I always read for a while before going down to sleep.
     
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