beforehand\preliminarily\in advance

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello, members :),
I'd like to learn how to use them properly in different contexts, but first I'd like to know if there is any difference in meaning between them. Maybe "in advance" is a little bit different. Here are some examples:
"If you want to visit me in April, you have to book the plane tickets beforehand\preliminarily\in advance.". Which of them is most appropriate in this context? I know that when it comes to cooking, people say "preheated oven", but can we say "The oven needs to be heated in advance\beforehand.". I have to admit that the second versions sound a little odd to my ears, but I am not sure if they are gramatically wrong. I just wander if there is any difference in meaning and how they are properly used :).
"In advance" I don't find very confusing, but beforehand\preliminarily sometimes confuse me a lot :S. What do you think, dear friends?


Thank you in advance and tell me if you need more examples :)
Thank you for your time
Gandalf
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Q1: "If you want to visit me in April, you have to book the plane tickets beforehand\preliminarily\in advance.". Which of them is most appropriate in this context?

    For me, 'in advance', or 'beforehand'.

    Q2: "The oven needs to be heated in advance\beforehand."

    Either, in my view.

    Both examples would support the use of 'ahead of time' too.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Thank you very much, Beryl :),
    your explanation is very clear :). To me it seems that beforehand\in advance are more frequently used, is that right? I am not a native speaker and I can't say, because I cling to my knowledge of the grammar, but is there any distinct difference between in advance and beforehand?
    Thank you very much, Beryl
    Gandalf :)
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    >> To me it seems that beforehand\in advance are more frequently used, is that right?

    Than 'preliminarily'? Yes, I think that's probably true. For one thing, it's quite hard to pronounce. :eek::)

    If you were to use it in those examples, it would have to come before the verb:


    "If you want to visit me in April, you have to preliminarily book the plane tickets."
    "If you want to visit me in April, you preliminarily have to book the plane tickets."

    "The oven needs preliminarily to be heated in advance\beforehand."
    "The oven needs to be preliminarily heated in advance\beforehand."

    (Depending on how much of a fuss pot you are about split infinitives)

    All four examples are a little odd, because 'preliminarily' is a rather formal sounding word, and those contexts are not.
     

    i heart queso

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    is there any distinct difference between in advance and beforehand?
    To me they are slightly different, but it's hard to explain what the difference is. I found this thread and also this one that gives some ideas for anyone curious about this.

    "In advance" = at some point before the second thing - usually some time before the second thing, not immediately before.
    "Beforehand" = the emphasis is that something needs to be done before another thing can be done - usually closer to or immediately before the second thing.

    This was probably not helpful at all - the links I posted above are better :)
     
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