befriend VS befriend with

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ultraviolet69

New Member
Turkey, Turkish
What's the difference between "befriend" and "befriend with"? When should I use the former and when the latter?
 
  • tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hello ultraviolet. I think we could use some context here - if you read the rules, they ask for context in posts. Believe me the context is really important. I cannot think of a time when I would ever use befriend with.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    To befriend is a verb that takes a person (etc.) as the direct object, so the use of "with" will always be incorrect.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Anne is the kind of person I would befriend with joy.

    It doesn't sound too natural, but it'll give you an idea of how I could use befriend with :D (yes, I'm cheating here)
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Why not? It sounds fairly natural to me. I would give another example here: It is good for your career to befriend the important people here".
    I was trying to find a sentence in which I'd use "befriend with". As you and the others said, you can't befriend with somebody. But you can still use "befriend with", only not in the sense you were discussing earlier.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Sorry, I did not get what you mean here.
    I'm sorry, I will try to explain what I meant, but I can't promise I won't muck it up even more :eek:

    To befriend is a verb that takes a person (etc.) as the direct object, so the use of "with" will always be incorrect.
    So far we know you can't say "I befriended with him/her". It's always wrong to say befriend with... (someone)

    I cannot think of a time when I would ever use befriend with.
    That's when I tried to think of a sentence in which we could use "befriend with".

    Anne is the kind of person I would befriend with joy.
    I'm saying you can indeed use this word sequence and keep the sentence grammatically correct, but with will no longer refer to a person, so this is not really what the original question was about... :eek:

    Did I manage to confuse you even more?
     
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