beginning or begining?

chinaboy

Member
France-French
hi all,

I post this new thread coz it alsways give me headaches when I want to know if I should write any word which required to have a lettre written twice (like in beginning). I tried to search it how to say 'lettre doublee' in english but i couldn't find in the dictionnary.
I think the tips will be very helpful for anyone who learns english.
 
  • mzg

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Hi
    Verbs that finish in consonant+ vowel +consonant will double the consonant. But, W, Y, and X never double
    Swim -> Swimming
    Buz -> Buzzing
    Trek-> Trekking but Drink-> Drinking


    See you
     

    Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    I am afraid it is not so simple, mzg.

    One condition for the final consonant to be doubled is the letter pattern you indicated (consonant / wowel / consonant).

    But this in itself is not sufficient for the final consonant to be doubled.

    A second condition is that the STRESS (accent tonique in French) must fall on that syllable as well.

    There are a few exceptions to this second rule in British English only (not American English, e.g. cancelled (GB) / canceled (US); travelled (GB) / traveled (US).
     

    DDT

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    chinaboy said:
    hi all,

    I post this new thread because it always give me headache when I want to know if I should write any word which required to have a letter written twice (like in beginning). I tried to search it how to say 'lettre doublée' in english but i couldn't find in the dictionnary.
    I think some tips might be very helpful for anyone who learns English.
    I made some corrections, yet a native might improve the form which sounds slightly odd...;)

    Anyway it's definitely "beginning"

    DDT
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    chinaboy said:
    . I tried to search it how to say 'lettre doublee' in english but i couldn't find in the dictionnary.
    Hi chinaboy

    doubled letter or, since the issue chiefly concerns consonants, double consonant.
    Look at jmc's reply, he uses this expression several times.
    More information here (specific to American English).
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=10813&highlight=doubled
    But you hardly need it since what is said in that thread reflects what jean-michel has already told you.
     

    ameridude

    Member
    USA/English
    Jean-Michel Carrère said:
    I am afraid it is not so simple, mzg.

    One condition for the final consonant to be doubled is the letter pattern you indicated (consonant / wowel / consonant).

    But this in itself is not sufficient for the final consonant to be doubled.

    A second condition is that the STRESS (accent tonique in French) must fall on that syllable as well.

    There are a few exceptions to this second rule in British English only (not American English, e.g. cancelled (GB) / canceled (US); travelled (GB) / traveled (US).
    we use cancelled and travelled in the US. I believe canceled and traveled are British, but I'm not sure.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    ameridude said:
    we use cancelled and travelled in the US. I believe canceled and traveled are British, but I'm not sure.
    No, we would say cancelled and travelled, I think. Canceled and traveled look weird to me. They look like they want to be pronounced canceeeeled and traveeeeled.
     

    Eddie

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Yo, dudes! Canceled and traveled are currently used in the US as part of an unofficial spelling simplification initiative.


    Cancelled and travelled are definitely British spellings (and can still be seen in American literary works of past decades).

    Hey! I just noticed I reached 500 posts!
     

    Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    IMO the 'simplification' in this case seems justified in terms of compliance with the general rule. With this rule in mind, the 'travelled' and 'cancelled' forms can indeed be regarded as 'aberrant'.
     

    Eddie

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi, Jean-Michel!

    You'll probably get a lot of flack for that statement. Wait and see. But in light of the doubling rule, this is the first time I'm seeing it through your eyes.
     

    chinaboy

    Member
    France-French
    DDT said:
    I made some corrections, yet a native might improve the form which sounds slightly odd...;)

    Anyway it's definitely "beginning"

    DDT
    Thanks for the corrections DDT. :thumbsup: For the French accents in my posts, I apologise but I don't know how i can write them. I know it when i'm working on WORD with a QWERTY keyboard but not when I'm sending posts on this website or messages on any other websites. is it the same as when i'm using WORD?
     
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