Behind a push

shiness

Senior Member
Korean, South Korea.
The rift among Republicans over the legislation comes as Bush has tried to rally his party behind a push to emphasize national security before elections in November in which Republicans are trying to maintain control of Congress.


The phrase in blue is where my question mark hangs over at, and I wonder
If it meant that the president tried to gather together his party members
to pay support to national security apart from his effort into passing the proposal?

That preposition "Behind" leaves me extra choices to wonder since it could've been used as a kinda of ..negative. :confused:

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Awaiting your confirmation.
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Greetings Shiness,

    It's a pretty badly written sentence!

    Here is the confusing part:

    Bush has tried to rally his party behind a push to emphasize national security before elections in November...


    In fact, Bush has tried to rally his party behind the security issue, and not behind the push to emphasize that issue.

    Don't feel bad that it was difficult to understand. The writer twisted a cliché, and the editor did nothing to correct it.

    It is fairly common to say unite behind or rally behind something or someone, but the sentence you quoted is not very logical and confusion is a likely result. A native speaker will understand it, more through intuition than as a result of the sentence itself.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I think if the writer had used the word his effort it might have been easier to understand, although, as you say cuchullete, a native speaker would get the idea anyway and would not bother to analyze the wording.
     

    Brian P

    Senior Member
    "Behind" is not used in a negative sense here, Shiness. If you want to push something you have to place yourself behind it. Your understanding of the phrase in question is perfectly correct.

    Regards,

    Brian
     
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