behold your work

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Patatos

Senior Member
Français
Hello,

I am writing a cover letter. I want to write that I have seen the work of the company before (this company makes arts pictures).
I used "I had the chance to learn about 'company name' and behold your work at"

Can I use behold in this sentence ? I just want to emphasize that I was amazed by their work. << One question per thread, please. >>

Thank you very much for your help.
 
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  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    You could, but would be unwise to do so - it is not a word that is used in normal modern English, and it does not imply amazement.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    What is wrong with using the normal English words? If you want to tell them how good their work is do it the English way by using adjectives.
     

    Patatos

    Senior Member
    Français
    Ok, thanks :) I will do that. Actually, I wanted to say that I took time to watch all of it, like a painting. Can you use "see" for a painting ?
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "I had the chance to learn about 'company name' and behold your work at" :confused:
    At what? You have not given a complete sentence. The best word may depend on the full context.

    Is it "at your website", "at your gallery", or what?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I saw your outstanding work at a convention / on a website / on a wall / in a small, poorly-lit room are all normal English.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    at a convention about art.
    Okay.

    "I had the chance to learn about 'company name' and see/view your work at an art convention."

    "to see" is a neutral (and non-active) verb. You can "see" a work of art without being interested. Example "I was the electrician at the convention. I saw a lot of art but didn't bother to look closely."

    If you "view" something it has an active sense. "I took the time to view as much of the art as I could." or "I attended a formal viewing of the art."

    Perhaps you could say why you don't like the words "see" or "view" ?


    (cross-posted)


     
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    Patatos

    Senior Member
    Français
    I had the feeling that view didn't depict the fact of looking closely to a picture such as the verb "admire" does. But it seems that it will be better to keep it simple. I will use view I think. Thank you very much :)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with Biffo that view has a more active meaning - you need to decide how your sentence is framed - you added the point about taking the time after your original post.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The way in which you phrase your sentence.
    Originally
    "I had the chance to learn about 'company name' and behold your work at"
    Later
    "Actually, I wanted to say that I took time to watch all of it"
    If you want to make it clear that you watched it all, then view is better than see. If the emphasis is on "I had the chance to ..." then I don't think it matters if you use see or view.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Maybe you could rephrase your sentence Patatos now that we have discussed it. :) How would you write it now?
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Hi,

    Can I use "something to behold" to describe Bhutanese textiles:

    Bhutan's hand woven textiles are something to behold for their fine intricate motifs and complex patterns.
     
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    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Can I use "something to behold" to describe Bhutanese textiles...
    I would say yes.

    However, I think the expression should be written with or as if with an exclamation mark. Thus, I'd phrase your sentence such that 'something to behold' comes at the end:

    With their fine intricate motifs and complex patterns, Bhutan's handwoven textiles are something to behold!
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    A belated thank you to EStjarn. Your version is good as it puts the stress on "something to behold", which is what I intended to achieve.

    Here I got another question regarding the meaning of "behold":

    Example: But there is one minority that I still behold with a benign bewilderment, and that is the very, very rich. I mean people who have so much money they can fly by private jet, and who have gin palaces moored in Puerto Banus, and who give their kids McLaren supercars for their 18th birthdays and scour the pages of the FT’s “How to Spend It” magazine for jewel-encrusted Cartier collars for their dogs.

    Background: Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, has sparked controversy with his open letter calling for a stop on anti rich sentiment in UK. In the letter, he says the public tends to give short shrift to the 1% rich's contributions to Britain. He says they have become a targeted, pit-upon minority and a convenient scapegoat for any social and economic problems. His solution for the wealth gap is providing opportunities for more people to join the ranks of billionaires.

    I feel that "behold" is used to mean more of "thinking, regarding" than "seeing". Do you think it's literally mean "to see or look at"?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Reply to post 17:

    Yes, I think it does mean "see/look at" rather than "think of", redgiant.

    The idea that Boris Johnson is trying to convey is almost that of someone looking at animals in a zoo: the very rich are seen as strange and exotic creatures that you "gawp at".
     
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