beim/am Kochen

americathebeautiful

Member
English (US)
Hello!
I would like to know when you say "beim" and when you say "am".
Ich bin beim kochen.
Ich bin am kochen.

This is what I understand:
Say someone calls you out of the kitchen and asks you to do something, then you'd say, "Ja gut, aber ich bin doch beim kochen".
But if somebody would call your name from outside the kitchen and you're stirring something on the stove that's about to burn, you'd yell back, "Ich bin am kochen!"

Is this right, or is there really no difference at all?
 
  • sma099

    Senior Member
    German
    Hi,

    I am not sure about any rule, but I don't see anything wrong with using either version in your example sentences (with a capitalized K, though).

    Personally, I would rather say Ich koche gerade, especially in a more formal, written text. The Duden and others seem to allow this construction with am nowadays (Grammatik in Fragen und Antworten ), but I don't agree with that and I would still consider am to be informal in that context and not recommend using it (in a written text).
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, I would understand "am Kochen" figuratively. It is an idiom and means "I am really very angry", compare: "Er kocht vor Wut." It may depend on context, however.
    Ich bin beim Kochen. - This might be used for: Ich koche gerade.

    "Ich bin am Telefonieren" is another case. It means just "Ich telefoniere gerade".
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    Ich bin die Kuh am Schwanz am Stall am raus am ziehen.
    ... looks incorrect in my eyes: one "am" to many:
    Ich bin die Kuh am Schwanz am Stall raus am ziehen
    or
    Ich bin die Kuh am Schwanz am Stall am rausziehen.

    Say someone calls you out of the kitchen and asks you to do something, then you'd say, "Ja gut, aber ich bin doch beim kochen".

    „Aber ich koch' doch gerade!”

    But if somebody would call your name from outside the kitchen and you're stirring something on the stove that's about to burn, you'd yell back, "Ich bin am kochen!"

    „Stör mich nicht, ich koch' gerade!”

    "Am Kochen"
    sounds rather Ripuarian (and ambiguous at that).


     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, I am living in Saxxony, and I came from Franconian area of Thuringia (as language background).

    In my area only "Ich bin am arbeiten" is regularly used. Almost all other such forms are seldom. Ich bin am telefonieren" is seldom, it does seldom make sense. The other partner at the other side of the telephone knows it and if someone asks you "What are you doing now?" it would be rather strange that he or she does not see it.

    Ich bin die Kuh am Schwanz am Stall am rausziehen.
    I like this. A good language joke.

    Note: I found that because of grammaticalisation both lower and uppercase might bei possible.
    Ich bin am arbeiten. Ich bin am Arbeiten.
    This was given in the link from #2.
    Grammatik in Fragen und Antworten


    ---

    After reading the article again: "Ich bin am Verzweifeln", and "Der Preis ist am sinken" are rather common.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Back to: Beim Kochen is often used as object.

    If you use it as object, it is very common.
    Beim Kochen wurde er gestört. (This can also be used in formal language.)

    It is seldom used as predicate.

    Ich bin gerade beim Kochen. (This is used in coll. language.)

    "Am Kochen" is never used as object.

    We discussed the predicative usage above. The form is called "Rheinische Verlaufsform".

    A non-satirical description is in the Wikipedia ("Am-Progressiv")
    am-Progressiv – Wikipedia
     
    Last edited:

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    "Ich bin am Kochen."
    ist für mich in der Allstagssprache "völlig normal", in Übereinstimmung mit dem von Hutschi verlinkten Artikel:
    Das Progressiv
    (1) Paula ist am Singen.
    (2) Paula ist beim Singen.
    Typ (1,2) wird nach der vermuteten Herkunftsregion auch "rheinische Verlaufsform" genannt, wenngleich die Formen mittlerweile im ganzen deutschen Sprachgebiet verbreitet sind (mit Schwerpunkt aber in der Ursprungsregion und in niederdeutscher Umgangssprache).
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi,
    Paula ist beim Singen - I would interprete this not as progressive form but as idiom for a place: Paula is attenting a course "Singen", or Paula is attending a singing group/choir. (Like: Paula ist beim Chor. Paula ist in der Singestunde.)

    Usually it implies "Sie ist nicht hier, sondern sie ist beim Singen." (common coll. language)
     
    Last edited:

    slowlikehoney

    New Member
    German
    I would use them interchangeably, but like Hutschi said, only the second example can also have the figurative meaning I'm really angry.

    Ich bin (gerade) beim kochen. (I'm cooking right now.)
    Ich bin (gerade) am kochen. (I'm cooking right now. / Im mad right now.)
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    I would like to know when you say "beim" and when you say "am".
    Ich bin beim kochen.
    Ich bin am kochen.

    This is what I understand:
    Say someone calls you out of the kitchen and asks you to do something, then you'd say, "Ja gut, aber ich bin doch beim kochen".
    Both are not standard German forms of continuous tense and should be avoided -- at least by language learners.

    The standard German method to imply continuous tense is the adverbial:

    Ich kann jetzt nicht -- ich koche gerade!

    The "am" version is colloquially common, but cannot be used for all kinds of verbs -- at least not in whole Germany. There are many dialectal usages, though, which are not understand and used everywhere.

    However, "beim" is used differently in most situations. It might be related to a certain aspect of continuous tense, but is not identical to the English continuous.
    Paula ist beim Singen
    Right. "Beim" usually is interpreted as "being somewhere and doing something".

    Paula ist beim Singen. <singing with her choir>
    Herbert ist beim Angeln. <staying outdoor to do fishing>
    Jens hat sich heute beim Fußballspielen furchtbar geärgert. <while playing football>
    Ich bin beim Rasenmähen. <mowing the grass>

    Please note that Paula might just having some cookies while the choir has a short break, that Herbert might be outdoor but is actually not just fishing, but maybe preparing a caught fish or having a rest. Jens might have become angry because he was not allowed to play but had to sit on the bank. Note that "beim" is NOT a real continous form, but in some cases might coincide with it.
     

    americathebeautiful

    Member
    English (US)
    Both are not standard German forms of continuous tense and should be avoided -- at least by language learners.
    Okay, so I'll take that as the verdict. You can say it, but it's better not to write it.
    I had the question, because in an essay I wrote "Jeden Tag um 17:00 Uhr bin ich am/beim Kochen." Maybe it would be better to say, "bin ich in der Küche... [something...]
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Okay, so I'll take that as the verdict.
    Do you consider Kajjo as the Oracle of Delphi or some kind of "final authority"? ;)

    Personnaly, I prefer to stick to objective articles like this one: Grammatik in Fragen und Antworten
    Die Bildung verschiedener Tempora ist möglich
    (39) Paula ist am Staubsaugen. [Präsens]
    (40) Paula war am Staubsaugen. [Präteritum]
    (41) Paula ist am Staubsaugen gewesen. [Präsensperfekt]
    ....
    This kind of construction seams very natural to me (& some more of us here).
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Okay, so I'll take that as the verdict. You can say it, but it's better not to write it.
    I had the question, because in an essay I wrote "Jeden Tag um 17:00 Uhr bin ich am/beim Kochen." Maybe it would be better to say, "bin ich in der Küche ... :tick:[something...]
    ... bin ich in der Küche und bereite das Abendbrot vor.

    Note, however, that "beim Kochen" is fully standard as prepositional object.
    Beim Kochen variiert er die Zutaten oft.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    some clear sort of rule so I always know I'm 100% right.
    There is a clear rule:
    'Paula ist am Singen.":
    die Form[ .... ist] mittlerweile im ganzen deutschen Sprachgebiet verbreitet.
    der Duden (seit 1998) und die Duden-Redaktion [haben] inzwischen kein Problem damit
    You can use it.
    should be avoided
    Why should you follow this "rule" (which is not an "established rule"!)? Even language learners can use it, IMO.

    cf:
    Die Kinder sind am Spielen
    People say "die Kinder sind am Spielen". But this is considered very colloquial,
    The claim that the German progressive would be considered "very colloquial" is a prescriptive exaggeration. This special grammatical construction is not only common in speech but is also widespread in writing, even in major newspapers. Consequentially, it's now considered well-formed also by several normative grammars, e.g. Duden-Grammatik.
    ...
    So, there is really no reason for not using the progressive. ;)
    And
    Er ist am Überlegen.
    Übrigens, der "böse" ;-) Duden stellt in der neuesten Ausgabe des Bands (2007) fest, dass die Verlaufsform mit am inzwischen „teilweise schon als standardsprachlich angesehen" wird (zitiert nach Verlaufsform – Wikipedia).
    And
    am Aufräumen dran
    Die Form "ich bin am Aufräumen" ist vor allem in NRW verbreitet. Sie ist dort sehr verbreitet. Darum wird sie als "Rheinische Verlaufsform" bezeichnet. Sie kommt aber, weniger häufig, auch in anderen Regionen vor. Manchmal hört man auch das verstärkende "dran", das ist aber nicht Teil der grammatischen Form, sondern, wie gesagt, eine Verstärkung.
    and
    Der Progressiv mit „am“ [...] wird auch als rheinische Verlaufsform [...] bezeichnet. Solche Klassifizierungen sind allerdings irreführend, da sich diese Satzkonstruktion im gesamten westdeutschen Sprachraum bis in die Schweiz nachweisen lässt.
    Von mir hervorgehoben
     
    Last edited:

    americathebeautiful

    Member
    English (US)
    Why should you follow this "rule" (which is not an "established rule"!)? Even language learners can use it

    Okay, so I can use it.

    Thanks for that. What I now gather, is that the 2 forms are essentially the same. Just,
    "Das Subjekt muss allerdings in der bei-Konstruktion Agens sein:" There

    Sie ist beim Wasser Kochen.:tick:

    *Das Wasser ist beim Kochen.:cross:

    Paula ist am Staubsaugen.:tick:


    Paula ist beim Staubsaugen.:tick:


    Paula ist fröhlich/gern am/beim Arbeiten.:tick:


    Paula ist seit Stunden/seit Tagen/wegen des nahen Fests am/beim Arbeiten.:tick:


    *Paula ist nie am/beim Staubsaugen.:cross:


    *Paula ist am Lesen eines Buchs.:cross:


    Paula ist beim Lesen eines Buchs.:tick:
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Es gibt hier sicher Entwicklungen und Übergangsformen.
    Schon die Frage der Grammatikalisierung ist interessant. Ist es Verb oder Substantiv? Ist es eine Konjugationsform?

    Ich wohne weit außerhalb des Rheinischen Gebietes. Hier wird die Form für einige Formen voll anerkannt (Ich bin am Arbeiten), für andere eher nicht (ich bin am Kochen), für noch andere gar nicht (ich bin am Sehen).
    Semantisch problematisch ist: "Ich bin am Schlafen." Dagegen funktioniert gut: "Ich bin am Einschlafen."

    Wenn es eine Konjugationsform ist, wird das Verb kleingeschrieben. Beim Duden noch nicht, aber bei anderen wird es schon kleingeschrieben.

    Man muss die Wörter kennen, für die die Form akzeptiert wird.

    PS: "Sehr" kolloquial/umgangssprachlich ist eher eine Bewertung als eine neutrale Beschreibung.
    Umgangssprachlich ist eine normale Sprachform. "Sehr umgangssprachlich" ist eine abgewertete Sprachform.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Es kann funktionieren, wird aber in meinem Sprachgebiet praktisch nicht im gegebenen Sinn verwendet.
    Es ist wahrscheinlich regional unterschiedlich.
    Auch "beim Kochen" wird hier praktisch nicht prädikativ verwendet.
    Objekt kann es sein.
    Am Kochen finde ich besonders das Naschen gut.
    Beim Kochen möchte ich nicht gestört werden.

    PS:

    Er ist schon wieder am Kochen. = Er kocht schon wieder vor Wut.
    In dieser Form gibt es hier regional keine Probleme (außer der Wut).
    Vielleicht blockiert diese Bedeutung die andere.

    Die "am"-Form ist hier nicht produktiv, sondern wird nur in festen Vebindungen verwendet.
    Man kann sie mit den meisten Verben nicht verwenden.

    Das meint sicher Kajjo, wenn er Deutsch-Lerner warnt.

    In einigen Gegenden ist die Form normal und produktiv für sehr viele Verben.

    In anderen nicht.

    (Wer mich kennt, weiß sicher, dass ich eher descriptiv als restriktiv argumentiere.)
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Okay, so I'll take that as the verdict.
    Yes, please prefer to express continuous tense with better, more natural standard German constructions. See below!

    I just like to look for some clear sort of rule so I always know I'm 100% right.
    You are absolutely right and I hope people will understand this wish of language learners. This point cannot be stressed strongly enough.

    Solution: Express continuous tense in past and present by an adverbial like "gerade".

    Ich mähe gerade den Rasen.
    Ich koche gerade.
    Ich bin gerade dabei, meine Hausaufgaben zu erledigen.

    This works in all cases, is very natural and idiomatic and absolutely correct in standard German for ALL teachers.
    I had the question, because in an essay I wrote "Jeden Tag um 17:00 Uhr bin ich am/beim Kochen." Maybe it would be better to say, "bin ich in der Küche... [something...]
    Yes, your sentence with "am Kochen" does not sound really idiomatic, because "am Kochen sein" has a quite dominant figurative meaning as explained above ("to be furious"). "Beim Kochen" does not work here anyway.

    "bin ich in der Küche
    Definitely, yes. Idiomatic, natural sentences are:

    Um 17:00 Uhr stehe ich normalerweise in der Küche.
    Gegen 17:00 Uhr kannst du mich quasi an jedem Tag in der Küche finden.
    Um fünf bin ich eigentlich immer in der Küche.

    Please note that we do not usually express continuous tense in regular, repeated tasks like this. We just phrase it differently, because we do not really think in a concept like continuous tense here.
    Do you consider Kajjo as ... some kind of "final authority"?
    Maybe she should as far as recommendations for language learners are concerned... Again, "am + Verb" and "beim + Verb" are common and natural, but they are restricted to certain cases. Outside dialect they cannot be used straight-forward in all continuous tense situations.
    Your link at least is highly misleading. Quotation on that page: "Die Akzeptabilität in der Hochsprache und schriftlichen Explizitsprache steigt von 1-4, besonders (1) gilt traditionell (z.B. Duden 1966, 1984) als umgangssprachlich oder regional markiert und wird in Schulen oft beanstandet"

    I regard it as highly unfair, to cite only the next sentence "Duden has no problems"... is this your way of arguing? Really?! Wow.

    We can mention alternatives, but we should not recommend controversial issues to learners. Stick to the safe side when teaching learners. German is complicated enough.

    I regard it as particularly important in this case, since native speakers of languages with continuous tense tend to seek a clear construction and it is DRASTICALLY more important to teach them that German does not has and need such a grammatical continuous construction, rather than to teach pseudo-continuous constructions that led learners astray. Learners are very eager to grasp this straw rather than to learn proper German.
    Note, however, that "beim Kochen" is fully standard as prepositional object.
    Beim Kochen variiert er die Zutaten oft.
    Right. This is a good argument against teaching "beim" as continuous tense. It is in very many cases not continuous tense, see also #11, lower part.

    Why should you follow this "rule" (which is not an "established rule"!)? Even language learners can use it, IMO.
    I really have an entirely different opinion here.

    Wieso soll(te) "Ich bin am Kochen." nicht funktionieren?
    Again, "am + Verb" works in many situations and even here. However, "am Kochen" has a figurative meaning as well which makes it even more difficult to select a proper phrasing and context without any possibility to be misunderstood.
    People say "die Kinder sind am Spielen". But this is considered very colloquial, some consider it dialectal (particularly frequent in dialects around the lower Rhine valley; therefore it is called "rheinische Verlaufsform").

    Unless your German is really good enough to judge the level of colloquiality appropriate in a given situation, I would advice you to stay clear of this construct.
    Right.
     
    Last edited:

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    your sentence with "am Kochen" does not sound really idiomatic, because "am Kochen sein" has a quite dominant figurative meaning as explained above ("to be furious").
    Within the appropriate contexte, nobody will think of "to be furious".

    Gerade den übertragen Sinn von "kochen" = "Vor Wut kochen / schäumen" würde m.E. kein Mensch mit einem Progressiv verwenden.
    "Er ist am Kochen (vor Wut). / Er kocht gerade (vor Wut)." :confused: Wer käme schon auf die Idee, sowas zu sagen (besonders ohne "vor Wut" hinzuzufügen!)?
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Whatever.

    I focus an teaching the correct "gerade" to stress a continuous aspect. I do not understand why you focus on "am"-constructions which are, depending on verb, context and phrasing, anywhere between common/idiomatic and dialectal/non-standard.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    I do not understand why you focus on "am"-constructions
    Why?
    Because of the question in the OP.
    Say someone calls you out of the kitchen and asks you to do something, then you'd say, "Ja gut, aber ich bin doch beim kochen".
    But if somebody would call your name from outside the kitchen and you're stirring something on the stove that's about to burn, you'd yell back, "Ich bin am kochen!"
    In both cases, I'd answer "Ich bin (doch) am Kochen!" That's all. :D

    -- ich koche gerade!
    would not be my first choice. (Ich bin nun mal ein "Südlicht":p:cool:.)
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    That makes it clear. I just wonder who's right?
    Well, I believe we sorted out "beim + verb" quite well: Absolutely possible and standard German, but in many cases not just an essentially continuous aspect, but a different meaning including some continuous aspect. Mostly it implies being somewhere and doing something, see #11.

    Er ist beim Kochen.
    not always simply equal with: He is cooking.
    in certain cases: He is in the kitchen and he is cooking. <almost what is intended in English>
    but more generally like: He went somewhere to cook there. Maybe he takes a cooking course.

    With regards to "am + verb": These are controversial. Some dialects use them very extensively, other regions do not so. Many linguistically educated speakers (here: Gernot #4, Berndf cited in #21) do not like these forms in standard German.

    In spoken, colloquial German very many native speakers use "am + verb" and even I find this very idiomatic and natural in many situations -- however, it is not always possible and by far not always idiomatic and sometimes sounds ridiculous or extremely dialectal. My restraint is not due to the fact that "am +verb" is not sometimes very idiomatic, but that it is difficult to apply in a safely accepted manner in standard German. Older Duden editions rejected it flat-out. Many teachers might still do so. This is why I recommend to learners not to use it.

    Personally, in most cases I feel a certain connotation when using "am + verb", the exact nature depending on the verb itself and the context it is used in. For me it is not a neutral continuous aspect, but mostly implies something else, e.g. annoyance.

    In addition, "am + verb" constructions are easily getting ridiculous in case of "verb+noun". "Am Buchlesen" or "am Lesen eines Buches"...? That sounds all wrong, bordering on parody (see #4).

    "Er ist am Kochen
    Another idea why just this example does feel so bad for me: Kochen can be used in two different meanings:

    meaning 1: to boil < a hot liquid is boiling>

    Das Wasser kocht schon.
    :thumbsup: Das Wasser ist schon am Kochen.

    Here the "am + verb" works for me, at least in colloquial spoken German. Probably, I would use this actively and it feels naturally to me.

    meaning 2: to cook <a meal is being prepared>

    Ich koche gerade.
    :thumbsdown:Ich bin gerade am Kochen.

    Here the two possible meanings mix badly. I think this is the reason that Hutschi and I so spontaneously are reminded of the figurative meaning which is derived from "boiling" not "cooking". I simply would never use it in this example.
     
    Last edited:

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    :thumbsdown:Ich bin gerade am Kochen.
    Für dich vielleicht, aber es gibt genug Beispiele für diese Kollokation:

    1) Progressive Tense
    Ich bin am Kochen. -oder- Ich koche gerade.
    2) »Dann müssen Sie aber mit reinkommen, ich bin am Kochen.« Man riecht es.
    3) Gemeinsam mit meiner deutschen Freundin stehe ich in seiner Küche und bin am Kochen.
    4) Ich bin am Kochen, Moritz schaut mir dabei interessiert von der Terasse aus zu.
    5) Ich bin am Kochen und gerade dabei fällt mir ein, dass hierzu vielleicht noch ganz gut dieses oder jenes passen würde...
    6) Irgendwann stehe ich dann am Herd, bin am Kochen und Pietro ist am Fernsehgucken.”
    .....

    Duden umgangssprachlich
    nicht auflösbar; bildet mit dem substantivierten Infinitiv und »sein« die Verlaufsform
    in Beispielen wie »er ist am Essen, ich bin noch am Überlegen«
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Für dich vielleicht, aber es gibt genug Beispiele für diese Kollokation:

    1) Progressive Tense
    Ich bin am Kochen. -oder- Ich koche gerade. ...

    2) »Dann müssen Sie aber mit reinkommen, ich bin am Kochen.« Man riecht es.
    3) Gemeinsam mit meiner deutschen Freundin stehe ich in seiner Küche und bin am Kochen.
    4) Ich bin am Kochen, Moritz schaut mir dabei interessiert von der Terasse aus zu.
    5) Ich bin am Kochen und gerade dabei fällt mir ein, dass hierzu vielleicht noch ganz gut dieses oder jenes passen würde...
    6) Irgendwann stehe ich dann am Herd, bin am Kochen und Pietro ist am Fernsehgucken.”
    .....

    Es sind typisch unterschiedliche Verwendungen. Im Gesamtsatz klingt es für mich eher idiomatisch als isoliert verwendet.

    1) Progressive Tense
    Ich bin am Kochen. -oder- Ich koche gerade. (Hier hatte ich die Bedeutung angegeben, über die Nutzung hatte ich später geschrieben. Isoliert würde ich "Ich bin am kochen" nicht aktiv verwenden, es aber gut verstehen.)

    2) »Dann müssen Sie aber mit reinkommen, ich bin beim Kochen.« ...
    3) Gemeinsam mit meiner deutschen Freundin stehe ich in seiner Küche und bin beim Kochen.
    4) Ich bin beim Kochen, Moritz schaut mir dabei interessiert von der Terasse aus zu.
    Ich würde hier ebenfalls "beim Kochen" vorziehen.
    5) Ich bin beim Kochen und gerade dabei fällt mir ein, dass hierzu vielleicht noch ganz gut dieses oder jenes passen würde...
    6) Irgendwann stehe ich dann am Herd, bin beim Kochen und Pietro ist am Fernsehgucken.”
    .....

    Außer bei "am Fernsehgucken" würde ich "beim" vorziehen - oder: "Ich koche gerade". Warum genau, weiß ich nicht. Inneres Wörterbuch?
    Ich komme aus einer Gegend, in der der Rheinische Progressiv nicht regelmäßig verwendet wird.

    Es ist vielleicht aber einfach ein regionaler Unterschied wie "an Ostern" und "zu Ostern". In meiner Gegend sagt man "zu Ostern" und "beim Kochen".

    Vermutung: "Am Kochen" wird sich hier (im Osten) auch stärker verbreiten.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Yes. It's the above-mentioned Rheinische Verlaufsform. It even applies to separable verbs: Auseinander am schrauben, zusammen am setzen, weg am laufen, durch am drehen ...
    Please note that all these extreme examples are NOT standard German and are received as being ridiculuous outside the dialectal region in which they developed. This is "funny German" but not proper German.

    But that is not even remotely Standard German.
    Indeed.

    2) »Dann müssen Sie aber mit reinkommen, ich bin am Kochen.« Man riecht es.
    :thumbsdown: 3) Gemeinsam mit meiner deutschen Freundin stehe ich in seiner Küche und bin am Kochen.
    4) Ich bin am Kochen, Moritz schaut mir dabei interessiert von der Terasse aus zu.
    5) Ich bin am Kochen und gerade dabei fällt mir ein, dass hierzu vielleicht noch ganz gut dieses oder jenes passen würde...
    :thumbsdown:6) Irgendwann stehe ich dann am Herd, bin am Kochen und Pietro ist am Fernsehgucken.”
    And you really feel all these examples to be idiomatic?! No, mostly these are bad examples of colloquial spoken German and should not be recommended. (3) feels even wrong with "stehe ... und am kochen" and (6), too.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    And I hope we all agree that this is far away from standard German.
    We do about this ↓ kind of "Progressiv"
    Auseinander am schrauben, zusammen am setzen, weg am laufen, durch am drehen ... :thumbsdown:
    but not about this
    Duden Beispiele wie »er ist am Essen, ich bin noch am Überlegen«
    or "ich bin am Kochen"!
    And you really feel all these examples to be idiomatic?!
    Yes, I do.
    Colloquial / umgangssprachlich :tick: but absolutly idiomatic (wenigstens in meinem Sprachgebiet).

    Noch einmal:
    Laut Duden wird sie inzwischen „teilweise schon als standardsprachlich angesehen“ (Duden Bd. 9, 6. Auflage 2007, S. 62)
    Die gilt dann aber wohl für die [...] auch in anderen Gegenden bekannte Form
    Ich bin am Lesen/beim Lesen des Buches,
    die mit den syntaktischen Mitteln der Standardsprache generiert wird: Lesen wird hier substantiviert gebraucht und das Akkusativobjekt das Buch mutiert entsprechend zu einem attributiven Genitiv.
    Ich bin das Buch am Lesen

    Interessant zu sehen, wie die Aussagen von einem Faden zum anderen moduliert werden .... ;)
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    We do about this ↓ kind of "Progressiv"
    I hope you include these examples in the "bad" category? For me these are just dialectal and not standard German.

    :thumbsdown: Er ist das Buch am Lesen.
    :thumbsdown: Er ist zur Zeit in Berlin am Wohnen.


    Colloquial / umgangssprachlich :tick: but absolutly idiomatic (wenigstens in meinem Sprachgebiet)
    This depends on the concrete example. There are several usages of "am+verb" that even I regards as absolutely acceptable and part of standard German, e.g.

    :thumbsup: Er ist noch am Leben.
    :thumbsup: Wie kann man ein Gespräch am Laufen halten?
    :thumbsup: Ich bin am Verhungern.
    :thumbsup: Alle Pflanzen waren noch am Blühen.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    For me these are just dialectal and not standard German.
    :thumbsdown: Er ist das Buch am Lesen.
    :thumbsdown: Er ist zur Zeit in Berlin am Wohnen.
    Of course. Wasn't that obvious from what I said?

    Ich frage mich allerdings, was "am Leben sein" hier zu suchen hat.
    Ich bin am Leben. Ich lebe gerade (= ich bin gerade damit beschäftigt zu leben) :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited:

    HilfswilligerGenosse

    Senior Member
    German, High German
    Ich bin am Leben. # Ich lebe gerade. :rolleyes:

    Eigentlich doch. Ich bin am Leben heißt (u.a. auch) Ich lebe gerade, besonders wenn man es selbst (als Ausruf o.Ä.) gebraucht. Ist nicht dieHauptbedeutung von der Betonung her (die wäre Ich bin nicht gestorben!/tot!), aber Ich lebe gerade ist mit enthalten...
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Ich frage mich allerdings, was "am Leben sein" hier zu suchen hat
    That's the point: "Am+Verb" is not limited to a sort of progressive or continuous aspect, but idiomatically something different.

    It is your mistake to postulate that "gerade + verb" is equal to "am + verb". That's what I try to emphasise all the time here. It very well may have such a connotation or usage, but fundamentally it is independent.

    In all four positive examples I gave in #35 I would NOT replace "am+verb" with "gerade + verb". That's the point!

    There are idiomatic usages of "am+verb" but simple replacements of "gerade" with "am+verb" are not always idiomatic and in a lot of cases carry different meaning or connotations. They are used differently in standard German. It is dialectal and wrong usage to simply take "am+verb" in all cases.

    Eigentlich doch. Ich bin am Leben heißt (u.a. auch) Ich lebe gerade
    Well, on one hand: yes. "Am+verb" includes a connotation of progressive state, of ongoing. On the other hand, altogether it conveys a lot more meaning and connotations than just progressive. That's the point why I do not believe in "am+verb" to be a valid continous replacement in all cases.
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, I fully agree to Kajjo's interpretation for usage "am + Verb" in standard German.

    Just a remark to difference between Rheinisch dialectal forms and standard:

    In dialect or regional coll. language, "Ich bin die Suppe am Kochen" is correct. I think this is the default "Rheinische Verlaufsform". It is not bad German this way. It is bad German in the register of standard German.

    If "am Kochen" is accepted (which is not the case in standard German for "ich bin am Kochen"), the form were: "Ich bin am Kochen der Suppe." (with genitive object "der Suppe")


    Kajjo gave an example for standard usage of "am Kochen" analoge to "Die Suppe ist am Kochen". This form includes "Die Suppe kocht gerade". It does not emphasize "gerade" (point in time), however it emphasizes the progressive state.

    After considering all, I have a question:

    Die Suppe/Das Wasser ist am Kochen. - This is clearly a progressive form. But after all the long diskussions here I'm in doubt now that it is the "Rheinische Verlaufsform". Usage and connotations are very different. Is it this form or did it come from another end of the language?
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    But after all the long diskussions here I'm in doubt now that it is the "Rheinische Verlaufsform". Usage and connotations are very different. Is it this form or did it come from another end of the language?
    I don't know but it very well may be that those occurences of "am+verb" in standard German are independent from the dialectal usage.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I found an interesting source.
    OLAF KRAUSE
    Progressiv-Konstruktionen im Deutschen im Vergleich mit dem Niederländischen,
    Englischen und Italienischen

    Krause compares the different "proggressive" versions:

    For example, he compares

    am-Konstruktion
    a) Präs Er ist am Arbeiten.
    ...
    (3) beim-Konstruktion
    a) Präs Er ist beim Arbeiten.
    ...

    dabei-Konstruktion25
    (4) a) Präs Er ist dabei, den Plan auszuarbeiten.
    ...

    Zur Ergänzung die unmarkierten Tempusformen + gerade:
    (5) a) Präs Er arbeitet gerade.
    ...

    I shortened it here very much. Krause shows all possible time forms.

    It is available in www.academia.edu.

    Progressiv-Konstruktionen im Deutschen im Vergleich mit dem Niederländischen, Englischen und Italienischen

    It is rather long and in German language but there are not many such works.

    He also considers "Rheinische Verlaufsform".

    PS: Another rather common example is:

    a)Um 6 war ich noch am Schwimmen.
    b)Um 6 war ich noch beim Schwimmen.
    c)Um 6 war ich noch schwimmen
     
    Top