being comfortably well off

bosori

Member
Korean-Korea
Hello,

I'm having trouble in understanding a phrase that appears in the first part of "A Cup of Tea" by Katherine Mansfield.
I would really appreciate if you could help me with the bolded phrases below.

<They were rich, really rich, not just comfortably well off, which is odious and stuffy and sounds like one's grandparents.>

Could anyone tell me in what sense "being comfortably well off" can be unpleasant and arrogant and sound old-dated?
Or could you let me know what the whole sentence means if I'm in the wrong track now?
Looking forward to kind answers. Thank you in advance!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You’re adding “arrogant” where it doesn’t belong as a synonym for what’s being said.

    “Being comfortably well off” is a euphemism for having quite a lot of money, like being “well to do.” Mansfield is saying – through a character, I presume – that the term is disgusting and stuffy and sounds like something someone one’s grandparents would say.

    Edit: adding “something.”
     
    Last edited:

    bosori

    Member
    Korean-Korea
    You’re adding “arrogant” where it doesn’t belong as a synonym for what’s being said.

    “Being comfortably well off” is a euphemism for having quite a lot of money, like being “well to do.” Mansfield is saying – through a character, I presume – that the term is disgusting and stuffy and sounds like someone one’s grandparents would say.
    Thank you Copyright!
    You are greatly helpful with this.:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
    With your brilliant explanation, the writer's intention is clear to me now.:D
    < --- >


    < Off-topic comment removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top