being cooked/cooking

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Ivan_I

Senior Member
Russian
Which one is correct?
I have a dish being cooked on my cooker.
I have a dish cooking on my cooker.

I think both are OK. NO?
 
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    "cooking/cooker" sounds strange to me. I think we'd say which part of the 'cooker' is being used. e.g I have a stew cooking in the oven / I have lamb chops cooking on the hob.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But it’s a strange thing to say. You’d normally either name the dish or just say “something”, and not mention the cooker (most people have a separate hob and oven anyway), since that would be taken for granted.

    I’ve got some potatoes on.
    I’ve got a casserole on the go.
    I’m baking a cake.
    I’ve got an apple pie in the oven.
    I’m doing a stir-fry on the hob.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Which one is correct?
    I have a dish being cooked on my cooker.
    I have a dish cooking on my cooker.
    What does "correct" mean? Yes, they are both grammatical and both have valid meaning, but neither of them is idiomatic.

    I have a dish being cooked on my cooker = somebody other than me is cooking a dish for me on my cooker.
    I have a dish cooking on my cooker = somebody, but not necessarily me, is cooking a dish on my cooker.

    But I can't imagine anybody using either, for the reasons others have mentioned.

    (most people have a separate hob and oven anyway),
    That claim will surprise Aga (who also make Raeburn ranges) and the various companies that sell single-oven and double-oven cookers - Neff, Hotpoint, Flavel, Zanussi, Rangemaster, Smeg ....
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I’m not sure why my passing remark about most people these days having a built-in oven and hob rather than a free-standing cooker has met with such reaction! :eek::D So maybe I’m wrong, but that was certainly my impression – and that’s why referring to something being “on the cooker” sounds odd to me.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have a dish being cooked on my cooker.
    I have a dish cooking on my cooker.
    Focusing on the difference between "being cooked" and "cooking":
    --- "being cooked" emphasises that someone is doing the cooking. So you could say, for example, "The meat was being cooked by Tom".
    --- "cooking" in this sentence merely identifies that the process was taking place.

    Note the different meaning of cook/cooked/cooking as:-
    (a) the effect of heat on the food
    and
    (b) the action of the person facilitating this process.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I’m not sure why my passing remark about most people these days having a built-in oven and hob rather than a free-standing cooker has met with such reaction! :eek::D So maybe I’m wrong, but that was certainly my impression – and that’s why referring to something being “on the cooker” sounds odd to me.
    Even those of us without built in units - including Aga owners - use the 'hob, hotplates, gas rings' separately from the 'oven' and, to me, don't refer to dishes being "in/on the cooker.'
     
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