Being Irish a Celtic language [word order?]

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tokieda

New Member
Japanese
Hello,
When I was reading about Irish language, I read the sentence:

"Being Irish a Celtic language, it has peculiar features which are unknown to other languages."

The word order of "Being Irish a Celtic language" looks curious for me. I guess that this impressive expression is an imitation of Irish VSO word order.
And, putting aside the context, can this word order be found in the other texts except for poetry? Or can it be seen only in the texts imitating foreign languages?
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please tell us your source for this quote, tokieda. You're correct that there's something odd about the word order.
     

    tokieda

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thanks for your replying, Florentia52. The quote is the first sentence in irishlanguage.net/irish/grammar.asp
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The punctuation is wrong:

    "Being Irish, a Celtic language, it has peculiar features which are unknown to other languages."

    Does that help?
     

    cubaMania

    Senior Member
    I must disagree with the insertion of that comma.
    I read this sentence as an unusual way of saying "Irish being a Celtic language, it has peculiar features which are unknown to other languages." or "Because Irish is a Celtic language, it has peculiar features which are unknown to other languages."
    I think the odd word order is probably archaic in English. Whether it's use in this text somehow reflects or is influenced by word order in the Irish language I do not know.
     

    tokieda

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thanks for your replying, PaulQ.
    Well, I am confused. When "it" means Irish, if punctuation is wrong, what does "Being Irish" mean?

    I read this sentence in cubaMania's way. I don't know about archaic English, although I understand this word order feels archaic and odd in modern. Thank you.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    The word order is indeed odd. It could be changed to:
    "Irish, being a Celtic language, has peculiar features which are unknown to other languages."
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    The punctuation is wrong:

    "Being Irish, a Celtic language, it has peculiar features which are unknown to other languages."

    Does that help?
    I think the additional comma might work if this sentence followed another one, but it does not.
    It is the very first sentence that leads off the section on Irish grammar.
    My thoughts on this are quite similar to CubaMania's.

    P.S. Welcome to the Forum, Tokieda!
    I notice that on that Irish Language website, there is a "Contact Us" you can click on.
    You might want to send them a message asking about the sentence.
    If you do and you get an answer, please let us know.
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks for your replying, PaulQ.
    Well, I am confused. When "it" means Irish, if punctuation is wrong, what does "Being Irish" mean?
    = As it is Irish [grammar], ... This follows directly as a comment on the title "Irish Grammar". The 'it' = Irish grammar.

    The way cubamania read the sentence "Irish being a Celtic language," does not fit with the following 'it', which again refers to Irish grammar:

    In cubamania's "Irish being a Celtic language, it has peculiar features ... .", it would refer to Irish language, which is not the topic addressed.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    This is an Irish-American(in-part)-Pseudo-Native-Speaker's perspective.

    Both of these sound okay to me:

    Irish being a Celtic language, it has ...
    Being Irish a Celtic language, it has ...

    Both of them strike me as meaning the same, just a different word order.
     
    Last edited:
    Its discussion of grammar is fairly sophisticated. Perhaps poor editing explains the problems. My opinion. Tokieda, above, suggests, too, that it's an attempt to mimic Irish word order. But the site reads rather well, I think.

    http://irishlanguage.net/irish/grammar.asp

    There are several mistakes or oddities in that short piece. To me that suggests a careless or non-native writer.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    http://irishlanguage.net/irish/grammar.asp There are several mistakes or oddities in that short piece. To me that suggests a careless or non-native writer.
    I agree that various things seem odd. I wonder whether these oddities are (perhaps intentionally) typical of native speakers of Irish who speak English as a second language, or otherwise typical of forms of English that are particularly strongly influenced by the Irish language. I suppose that, to know, we will have to wait till an Irish person reads this thread and comments.
     
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