being on the jib

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audiolaik

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,

There is another puzzling expression found in the book Among the Thugs:

Most of the supporters, he went on the explain, alcohol having no visible effect, came from either Manchester or London. "The ones from London are known as the Cockney Reds.Gurney is a Cockney Red. He doesn't travel anywhere unless he's on the jib." .... "Being on the jib, ...., means "never spending money"...."

Is the phrase in bold in widespread use in BrEnglish?

Is it an example of the language of working class Londoners?

Thank you!
 
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  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    It's not one I know, Audi. Nor does my 1,300-page slang dictionary. Our good friends at UrbanFictionary have 8 pages of jib definitions ... but I got bored at page 2.

    EDIT: The OED seems to know nothing even remotely like it either.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No - I haven't heard it before. Mind you, I've only been in London 15 years (and I don't regularly mingle with NF supporters, or even football fans). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Among_the_Thugs

    I suppose that meanings 22 and 27 in the Urban Dictionary, referring to getting out of having to do something, are relatable to never spending money. In fact, though, this sense of the verb jib is not really 'urban': the Oxford English Dictionary has examples of jib in the sense of to stop short in some action; to refuse to proceed or advance; to draw back, back out going back to the early 19th century.
     
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    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Hello,

    There is another puzzling expression found in the book Among the Thugs:

    Most of the supporters, he went on the explain, alcohol having no visible effect, came from either Manchester or London. "The ones from London are known as the Cockney Reds.Gurney is a Cockney Red. He doesn't travel anywhere unless he's on the jib." .... "Being on the jib, ...., means "never spending money"...."

    Is the phrase in bold in widespread use in BrEnglish?

    Is it an example of the language of working class Londoners?

    Thank you!
    Can't say I've heard it either. Is the book set in modern times? Why do you think it might be a London expression - is either the author or more importantly the character speaking a Londoner?
     

    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Can't say I've heard it either. Is the book set in modern times? Why do you think it might be a London expression - is either the author or more importantly the character speaking a Londoner?
    It is the word Cockney that makes me think this way.:D
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    It is the word Cockney that makes me think this way.:D
    Well, you see - with no other context - it was that which made me think otherwise. If the person speaking is describing him as a Cockney (along with saying "the ones from London") it might well suggest that he is not.
     

    Jim986

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    "On the jib" is not a very well-known or widely used expression; it doesn't originate in a city, either. It is in fact a seafaring term from the days of the windjammers, used to describe the sail setting with a strong following wind: in this case only a foresail was set, so the sailors had little work to do while the ship was on the jib - making "free" miles.
     
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    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I don't understand the connexion between He doesn't travel anywhere and unless he's never spending money [on the jib]. Does it go on to explain that?

    > KLANG! <
     
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    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    This is what comes next in the book:

    "You never want to pay for Underground tickets or train tickets or match tickets. In fact, if you are on the jib when you go abroad, you usually come back in profit.
    "

    Does it help?
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    This is what comes next in the book:

    "You never want to pay for Underground tickets or train tickets or match tickets. In fact, if you are on the jib when you go abroad, you usually come back in profit.
    "

    Does it help?
    No, not really - I think that this must be a very local expression (wherever it's from). Google seems to show no instances of it being used like this. Also it's interesting that in the original quote the speaker obviously felt the need to explain what "on the jib" meant.
     

    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No, not really - I think that this must be a very local expression (wherever it's from). Google seems to show no instances of it being used like this. Also it's interesting that in the original quote the speaker obviously felt the need to explain what "on the jib" meant.
    "Mick was surprised I didn't know what "being on the jib" meant."

    The narrator is American.
     
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    Jibbing

    New Member
    English
    Stumbled onto this forum when looking into reviews on the book mentioned by the OP.

    Jib is very a much a Manchester term and you wont find many londoners not part of the united family using the word.

    Basically to jib something is to obtain something for free, for example as mentioned in the book each week we travel by train to a football ground and we dont pay, using whatever skills we need to, to avoid paying. We jib into football grounds using various methods saving fortunes on tickets, its not like it was back then and its only really the youngsters that do it now as OB are way too on top.

    The term I do believe was originally coined by an old friend named Colin Blaney, I would highly reccomend reading his book grafters, he explains how they made Manchester slang up, such as dibble for police (inspector dibble?) hector for train conductor and jib was another, really good read and would highly reccomend it.

    Oh and our group back then we were called ICJ - Inter City Jibbers
     

    b1947420

    Senior Member
    British English
    Stumbled onto this forum when looking into reviews on the book mentioned by the OP.

    Jib is very a much a Manchester term and you wont find many londoners not part of the united family using the word.

    Basically to jib something is to obtain something for free, for example as mentioned in the book each week we travel by train to a football ground and we dont pay, using whatever skills we need to, to avoid paying. We jib into football grounds using various methods saving fortunes on tickets, its not like it was back then and its only really the youngsters that do it now as OB are way too on top.

    The term I do believe was originally coined by an old friend named Colin Blaney, I would highly reccomend reading his book grafters, he explains how they made Manchester slang up, such as dibble for police (inspector dibble?) hector for train conductor and jib was another, really good read and would highly reccomend it.

    Oh and our group back then we were called ICJ - Inter City Jibbers
    As if you were "poking / jibbing" your mates for a hand out.
    That's what comes to my mind hence "jib"
     
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