being out of market share

kanu

Senior Member
"I continue that I am out of share market." Can't I write in this way "I continue being out of share market." Other versions like: I continue staying out of share market. I continue remaining out of share market.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I continue that I am out of share market. :cross: 'I continue that . . . ' is unidiomatic. Better perhaps is 'I'm still not in the share market' ?
    I continue staying out of share market. :cross: 'I continue to stay . . . ' :tick:
    I continue remaining out of share market. :cross: 'I continue to remain . . . ' :tick:
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    I continue to be out.....
    I continue that I am out of share market. :cross: 'I continue that . . . ' is unidiomatic. Better perhaps is 'I'm still not in the share market' ?
    I continue staying out of share market. :cross: 'I continue to stay . . . ' :tick:
    I continue remaining out of share market. :cross: 'I continue to remain . . . ' :tick:
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    What market are you talking about?

    The way you write this, it's like a newsagent who has sold all his newspapers. ("I am out of newspapers.") or "The W.C. is out of toilet paper."
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    If someone is out of something like house, room etc....& continuing the process, how would I write that sentence, that's my question.
    What market are you talking about?

    The way you write this, it's like a newsagent who has sold all his newspapers. ("I am out of newspapers.") or "The W.C. is out of toilet paper."
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    What is "share market"? Do you mean "stock market"?

    "I continue to stay out of the stock market." :tick:
    "I continue staying out of the stock market." ???
    "I am still out of the stock market." :tick:
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    If someone is out of something like house, room etc....& continuing the process, how would I write that sentence, that's my question.
    As in the other two threads, kanu, "continue" is not the normal way to state a condition.

    He is still out of the house.
    He is still out of the room.
    He is still out of the country.
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    "I continue staying out of the stock market." :cross: You mean gerund is't required in continue.

    Ok, If I write I continue to be out of stock market is it idiomatic ?


    What is "share market"? Do you mean "stock market"?

    "I continue to stay out of the stock market." :tick:
    "I continue staying out of the stock market." ???
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Just to reinforce the point:

    Note from the above examples the vast difference between "out of" + object meaning you no longer have something and "out of" + article + object, meaning you are outside of something.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    /
    "I continue staying out of the stock market." :cross: You mean gerund is't required in continue.
    That is correct. The gerund is not required and often sounds unidiomatic.

    Ok, If I write I continue to be out of the stock market is it idiomatic ?
    We have had this question on another thread. Changing the sentence doesn't change the answer. :) "Continue to be out of" is not idiomatic in this context nor is it in most contexts, I would say, at least in American English.

    He continues to be out of the room. :cross:
    He continues to be out of the country. :cross:
    He continues to be out of the city. :cross:

    If it is a recurring pattern in his life where he constantly leaves and returns:

    He is continually/constantly out of the room / country / city.

    If it is a single absence and the absence hasn't come to an end:

    He is still out of the room / country / city.
     
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    kanu

    Senior Member
    It's just because of "continue", we don't accept such patters in continue.
    for instance, like, love, hate, enjoy a lot of phrases there, we can use "being out of ...."easily
    /

    That is correct. The gerund is not required and often sounds unidiomatic.



    We have had this question on another thread. Changing the sentence doesn't change the answer. :) "Continue to be out of" is not idiomatic in this context nor is it in most contexts, I would say, at least in American English.

    He continues to be out of the room. :cross:
    He continues to be out of the country. :cross:
    He continues to be out of the city. :cross:

    If it is a recurring pattern in his life where he constantly leaves and returns:

    He is continually/constantly out of the room / country / city.

    If it is a single absence and the absence hasn't come to an end:

    He is still out of the room / country / city.
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    That's one way to look at it. As I said on the other thread, "continues to be" refers to a behavior or an action.

    "He continues to be difficult about taking his pills." :tick:
    "He continues to be rude to the customers." :tick:

    It doesn't apply to states or conditions:

    "He continues to be unconscious." :cross:
    "He continues to be asleep." :cross:
    "He continues to be married." :cross:
    "He continues to be out of the room." :cross:

    He is still unconscious / asleep / married / out of the room. :tick:

    So, yes, you can use "he continues to be" if you are talking about a behavior, but not if you are talking about a state or a condition.
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    Finally, "continue to be" is used with only behavior.
    We can't take it, for instance, like, love, hate, enjoy a lot of phrases here, we can use "being out of ...."easily.
    That's one way to look at it. As I said on the other thread, "continues to be" refers to a behavior or an action.

    "He continues to be difficult about taking his pills." :tick:
    "He continues to be rude to the customers." :tick:

    It doesn't apply to states or conditions:

    "He continues to be unconscious." :cross:
    "He continues to be asleep." :cross:
    "He continues to be married." :cross:
    "He continues to be out of the room." :cross:

    He is still unconscious / asleep / married / out of the room. :tick:

    So, yes, you can use "he continues to be" if you are talking about a behavior, but not if you are talking about a state or a condition.
     
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    kanu

    Senior Member
    No.Without continue.
    For Instance, here are some examples :

    I like being out of the class room.

    I enjoy being out of the class room.

    I love being out of the class room.

    I hate being out of........whatever...:)


    Yes, that's what I said here and here.


    I'm not sure what you mean by this. Do you mean "continue being out of love / hate / enjoyment"? None of those makes sense to me.
     
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