being Santa with a beard

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
One more sentence from the story about Santa that (sentence), I believe, is awkward (though I may be wrong)
I think you have to have that special place in your heart that distinguishes you from being a person with a beard and being Santa with a beard.
http://www.npr.org/2012/12/22/167856912/its-not-jolly-its-a-job-pro-santas-say-its-more-than-just-the-beard

It seems like: 'distinguishes you from being a person with a beard and from being Santa with a beard', right?
Probably, the speaker has in mind "distinguishes you from being a person with a beard and makes you a Santa with a beard.
If so, is there any way to express this thought by using the second "being" ?

Thanks.
 
  • Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo, Vik.

    The sentence writer seems to be comparing "a person with a beard" to/with " Santa with a beard".
    In the writer's opinion the latter has to have something special...

    GS
     

    Nipnip

    Senior Member
    Español
    Hi, Girgio!
    Yes, I understand that, but the question is a bit different:)
    Yes, you can do without the second "being", you could actually not use any "being" and it still means the same. This redundancy is used for emphasis and is quite common, in fact, sometimes not using it may sound odd.
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No, it doesn't. He's not trying to say what you suggest after "Probably" in your first post which is different in meaning (having a kind heart doesn't make you a Santa with a beard). The problem is really with the way he uses "distinguish." Improvements with similar meaning:
    ... distinguishes between being a person with a beard and being Santa with a beard.
    ... distinguishes a person with a beard from a Santa with a beard.
     
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