being surprised, surprised

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hly2004

Banned
chinese
Hi, everyone:


Being surprised, he was left in dumbfounded.

Surprised, he was left in dumbfounded.

I know the correct one is the second one, but I don't know why the first one is wrong. Could you please explain it to me?

Best wishes.
 
  • rosalind

    Senior Member
    USA, American English
    Actually, both sentences are wrong. "Dumbfounded" is an adjective. We never use "in" before it.

    You can say:

    He was dumbfounded.
    He was surprised.
    He was left dumbfounded. (In this context, it means he was so surprised that he was temporarily unable to speak.)

    It is possible to say that someone was "in great surprise," although this is somewhat old-fashioned.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Oh, I am really sorry for my mistakes.

    My main concern is intended to be whether "being" could be ommitted without actual change of meanings. If the answer is yes, then why I could not say

    "Being glad, he accepted the appointment"?
    "Glad, he accept the appointment".

    It actually is from another recently posted thread.

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=409646
     
    Oh, I am really sorry for my mistakes.

    My main concern is intended to be whether "being" could be ommitted without actual change of meanings. If the answer is yes, then why I could not say

    "Being glad, he accepted the appointment"?
    "Glad, he accept the appointment".

    It actually is from another recently posted thread.

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=409646
    You could say, "Gladly, he accepted the appointment." This tells us he was glad.

    LRV
     

    MonaArg

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Spanish
    I see, many thanks:)
    Hello!
    But "gladly" would tell us how he did the action. Let's agree taht you have to be glad to do something gladly.

    I think I know what you mean by ADJ + comma + subject. I've read the other post.

    What about:
    Tired, he went to bed.
    which means: He was tired when he went to bed.

    Surprised, he went out.
    In this case, you could not said: Surprisedly he went out.

    But I'm not sure these examples are enough to explain the point.
    What do you think?

    Bye,
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    As I've already suggested elsewhere, I think that rhythm may change the way a sentence is produced and perceived.

    Glad, he accepted the appointment
    makes me uncomfortable

    Conversely, I would more readily accept something like :
    Glad as never before, he accepted the appointment.

    The difference here is the length of the initial adjectival phrase. Somehow I feel the former is too short (1 syllable), it's "not worth the comma", so to say. Might be just me, though.

    I'm aware surprised is just a tiny bit longer, but it might make a difference.

    I'd also like to add that this kind of initial AP, can sometimes explain why the subject is acting in such or such a way. I think it's the case, for instance in....
    Tired, he went to bed.
    I strongly sense "because he was tired" behind that one.
     
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