Being tough won't make you smart.

emsywemy

New Member
England, English
There is a line in the film Amores Perros by Octavio where he says "Being tough won't make you smart" to his brother - does anyone know what the are Spanish (or Mexican I suppose) for this is in the film?
 
  • He says: "Lo madreador no te quita lo pendejo".
    "Madreador" and "pendejo" are mexicanisms.
    Madreador: Someone who fights very well.
    Pendejo: Someone who is really stupid.
     
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    Lagartija

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Oh my! If I read your quote without this background information, I would have come to the opposite conclusion because I would have read it:
    Being a good fighter won't leave you a pendejo.

    Does no te quita mean "it doesn't leave you". Am I mixing the word order up?

    Could you explain the word order and how we get to "being tough won't make you smart" from that?
     
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    Alief

    Senior Member
    English US
    I've heard from a Spanish friend of mine who is from Spain, using the word, "tofudo" in reference to the English word, "tough". Is that a good word?
     

    dilema

    Senior Member
    Spain-spanish
    He says
    "Lo madreador no te quita lo pendejo"

    "madreador" and "pendejo" are mexicanisms
    madreador: someone who fights very well
    pendejo: someone who is really stupid
    If these are the original words, then the translation to english is not accurate, in my opinion.

    The Spanish version means: you are a good fighter, but anyway you are still stupid.

    The English version, however, suggests a quite different thing.
     

    dilema

    Senior Member
    Spain-spanish
    I've heard from a Spanish friend of mine who is from Spain, using the word, "tofudo" in reference to the English word, "tough". Is that a good word?
    I suppose the word you've heard is tozudo (although I don't think it's a good translation for tough; rather, for stubborn)
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    If these are the original words, then the translation to english is not accurate, in my opinion.

    The Spanish version means: you are a good fighter, but anyway you are still stupid.

    The English version, however, suggests a quite different thing.
    No, the English means more or less the same thing.
    (If you want corrections to your English, here's one: "English" is always capitalized)
    ;-)
     

    dilema

    Senior Member
    Spain-spanish
    No, the English means more or less the same thing.
    (If you want corrections to your English, here's one: "English" is always capitalized)
    ;-)
    Thanks for the correction :). I forget it too often.

    As for the English version, I'm afraid I need some clarification. When I read it, I understood:

    Being tough won't make you smart = don't think you are smarter just because you are a good fighter

    Am I wrong?
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    Being tough won't make you smart = you may be tough, but you're still dumb. Isn't that more or less what the Spanish original says?
    That construction always makes me think of the hilarious song by Los Mox "Lo Cortés No Quita Lo Caliente" ... XD
     

    yul081

    Member
    Spanish Costa Rica
    Hi!

    I most say I understand something different from the phrase in Spanish!

    Madreador: means he is "insulting his mother", cursing, swearing, etc... and even do he talks too much, that doesn't make him less "pendejo" cowbard, because after all he is just talking not acting!!
     

    dilema

    Senior Member
    Spain-spanish
    Being tough won't make you smart = you may be tough, but you're still dumb. Isn't that more or less what the Spanish original says?
    That construction always makes me think of the hilarious song by Los Mox "Lo Cortés No Quita Lo Caliente" ... XD
    Ok, K-in-sc. As you say, the English version says the same than the Spanish one. Thanks for the clarification.
     

    raitana

    New Member
    Spanish-Spain
    I've heard from a Spanish friend of mine who is from Spain, using the word, "tofudo" in reference to the English word, "tough". Is that a good word?
    Hello.
    I'm Spanish. I live in Spain but I've never heard such word as "tofudo". I think it is a horrible word and that you shouldn't even take it into consideration.
    I deeply regret to be so drastic but this "palabro", as we call certain neologisms,deserves it.
     
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