being unwilling to sup

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kyondaime

Senior Member
arabic
Hi everybody,
i found that sentence in a novel and i don't understand why they used "being" in the begining without the pronoun "he", could someone explain to why ?

Being unwilling to sup till he saw the whole
scene that was acted under his window, he called then for his supper, ate with a better appetite than he had done at any time after his coming to Samarcande, and listened with pleasure to the agreeable concert of vocal and instrumental music

thank you
 
  • Teiresias

    Member
    English--American, North Central
    "Unwilling to sup till he saw the whole scene that was acted under his window, he called. . . ."
    The underlined verb phrase above modifies the subject of the sentence "He." It is called a present participial phrase. A present participle is a verb stem + ing. The phrase is based on the underlying sentence: "He was unwilling to sup (to eat) till he saw. . ." In it shortened form, the verb phrase functions as an adjective phrase and is set off from the main clause by a comma.
     

    kyondaime

    Senior Member
    arabic
    Thank you for your answer, i have another question : why did you exlude "Being" from the beginning of the sentence did it make a different meaning?
    thank you
     
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