belegtes Brot/ Schnitte/Bemme

Ralf

Senior Member
German
gaer said:
What is "Bemm'paket"??? :(
"Bemme" is a slice of bread in the Saxon dialect. Thus a "Bemmenpacket" is a package of sliced bread or sandwiches. In the Saxon dialect the '...en' is almost mute or pronounced as prolonging the double 'm' preceding. So "Bemm'packet" is a literal phonetic transcription. Although I am from Saxony I really detest this dialect. It sounds somehow clumsy, uneducated and awkward. Thanks to my mother I grew up with the High German pronounciation.

Ralf
 
  • gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Ralf said:
    "Bemme" is a slice of bread in the Saxon dialect. Thus a "Bemmenpacket" is a package of sliced bread or sandwiches. In the Saxon dialect the '...en' is almost mute or pronounced as prolonging the double 'm' preceding. So "Bemm'packet" is a literal phonetic transcription. Although I am from Saxony I really detest this dialect. It sounds somehow clumsy, uneducated and awkward. Thanks to my mother I grew up with the High German pronounciation.

    Ralf
    Ah! Well, I would have gotten "Bemmpacket" if I had known "Bemmenpacket"!

    I don't know any dialects. But I've been told it's no better for you guys if you speak one, then go to another place in Germany where the dialect is totally different and you don't know it. True or not?

    Gaer
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    gaer said:
    Ah! Well, I would have gotten "Bemmpacket" if I had known "Bemmenpacket"!

    I don't know any dialects. But I've been told it's no better for you guys if you speak one, then go to another place in Germany where the dialect is totally different and you don't know it. True or not?

    Gaer
    It's hard for a person from Schleswig-Holstein to talk to a Bavarian or to a man from Baden-Württemberg, but if both of them would try a bit harder (to pronounce their words in High German), they COULD communicate with each other.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ralf said:
    "Bemme" is a slice of bread in the Saxon dialect. Thus a "Bemmenpacket" is a package of sliced bread or sandwiches. In the Saxon dialect the '...en' is almost mute or pronounced as prolonging the double 'm' preceding. So "Bemm'packet" is a literal phonetic transcription. Although I am from Saxony I really detest this dialect. It sounds somehow clumsy, uneducated and awkward. Thanks to my mother I grew up with the High German pronounciation.

    Ralf
    Thank you for the quick answer. BTW, how would you translate "Bemme" into English, Gaer and Ralf? Another suggestion than "slice bread"?

    I also grew up with the High German "dialect", although I'm living only twenty kilometers away from Saxony.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    whodunit said:
    Thank you for the quick answer. BTW, how would you translate "Bemme" into English, Gaer and Ralf? Another suggestion than "slice bread"?

    I also grew up with the High German "dialect", although I'm living only twenty kilometers away from Saxony.
    I'm not sure what "sliced bread" means, the way you are using it, because here that only means that you have bought a loaf of bread that is sliced (and that is almost always the way it is done).

    German makes an art out of bread, Who. Bread is just "bread" here. Eat a couple sliced of bread? Without something on them? Never. But in Germany I could make a meal out of different kinds of bread!

    Gaer
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    gaer said:
    ... German makes an art out of bread, Who. Bread is just "bread" here. Eat a couple sliced of bread? Without something on them? Never. But in Germany I could make a meal out of different kinds of bread!

    Gaer
    Hm, "The Art of Bread"--that sounds almost sublime. Since I already had the chance to enjoy American bread, taken straight from the original shrink-wrapping, I can understand that you guys feel something mysterious about German bread;). (On the other hand I've actually heard a Bud, Miller's or Coer's being called beer in America:D)

    But kidding aside, of course you can buy a bread sliced and wrapped in supermarkets and I'm pretty sure you'll find over here the same brands you can get at Publix' or WalMarts in America. However, in bakers' shops you usually buy a whole or at least a half loaf of bread off which you cut a few slices. Putting some butter, cheese, ham or whatever you like on them you can eat these slices of bread as some sort of sandwich or open sandwich that is called "belegtes Brot" or "Schnitte" in German language and "Bemme" in Saxony. I don't think there is a more adequate term for a single slice of bread other than 'some bread' or sandwich in English. I hope this is not too far off topic--please remember, the title of this thread is "Lichtspielhaus":).

    Ralf
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ralf said:
    Putting some butter, cheese, ham or whatever you like on them you can eat these slices of bread as some sort of sandwich or open sandwich that is called "belegtes Brot" or "Schnitte" in German language and "Bemme" in Saxony. I don't think there is a more adequate term for a single slice of bread other than 'some bread' or sandwich in English. I hope this is not too far off topic--please remember, the title of this thread is "Lichtspielhaus":).

    Ralf
    Let's stay off-topic or someone ought to start a new thread. ;)

    I can also remember follwing terms for "bread" in German:
    Stulle
    Schnitte [with very long i like in nie]
    Kanten [the end of a bread - maybe "crust"]
    and look here, Gaer, and tell me if you know all of these terms
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    whodunit said:
    Let's stay off-topic or someone ought to start a new thread. ;)

    I can also remember follwing terms for "bread" in German:
    Stulle
    Schnitte [with very long i like in nie]
    Kanten [the end of a bread - maybe "crust"]...
    Okay, let's 'go the whole hog' then. ;)
    Another term for 'Stulle', 'Schnitte', 'Bemme' or 'slice of bread': Kniffte
    The Saxon equivalent for Kanten = the end of a bread: Renft'l

    Ralf
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ralf said:
    Okay, let's 'go the whole hog' then. ;)
    Another term for 'Stulle', 'Schnitte', 'Bemme' or 'slice of bread': Kniffte
    The Saxon equivalent for Kanten = the end of a bread: Renft'l

    Ralf
    Good words, I've never heard or used them before. Look what I found and what I guessed:

    Gähse Käse
    Gaggau Kakao
    ä Renftl ein Kanten
    didschen titschen
    ä Stückl Fleesch ein Stück Fleisch
    ´ne Worschd Bämme eine Wurstschnitte
    ä Dässchen Heeßes ein Tässchen Heißes
    Mir issäs gar nich scheene Mir geht es gar nicht gut
    Was machtn ihre Alde Was macht denn Ihre Frau?
    Zusatz: ä Griebel ein Krepel???

    Source.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Ralf said:
    Hm, "The Art of Bread"--that sounds almost sublime. Since I already had the chance to enjoy American bread, taken straight from the original shrink-wrapping, I can understand that you guys feel something mysterious about German bread;). (On the other hand I've actually heard a Bud, Miller's or Coer's being called beer in America:D)
    No disagreement about our beer. Unfortunately, I can't drink alcohol (headaches, other health problems), but I can still get some nice non-alcoholic brands. I know this is a "sin" for true beer-drinkers, but I can tell you that the best I've had has come from Germany.

    As for bread, I'm not thinking of any kind of bread from ANY country that comes out of a package. :)
    But kidding aside, of course you can buy a bread sliced and wrapped in supermarkets and I'm pretty sure you'll find over here the same brands you can get at Publix' or WalMarts in America. However, in bakers' shops you usually buy a whole or at least a half loaf of bread off which you cut a few slices. Putting some butter, cheese, ham or whatever you like on them you can eat these slices of bread as some sort of sandwich or open sandwich that is called "belegtes Brot" or "Schnitte" in German language and "Bemme" in Saxony. I don't think there is a more adequate term for a single slice of bread other than 'some bread' or sandwich in English.
    We used to have a shop in town that baked bread in the style of what you are used to. It was run by a German (no surprise!), and I could just cut off hunks of various loaves of bread and eat them with nothing. That kind of bread is like a meal. It tells you why bread WAS considered so important, in the past.

    "belegtes Brot" has always been an extremely interesting German term to me. As you explained, it's a bit like our "sandwich", but not totally the same. Perhaps the closest thing we have is something called an "open-cheese sandwich", which is really on one piece of bread toated very quickly in a pan, with cheese on top. But that's not quite the same either. :)

    Gaer
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    whodunit said:
    ... And your example of an "open sandwich" (pic: http://www.student.kuleuven.ac.be/.../smor3.jpg ) reminds me of our German "Arme Ritter". Maybe Ralf can confirm it, at leat in Brandenburg it's a famous "dinner" meal.
    Well, I know "Arme Ritter" as a slice of white bread dipped in milk and beaten egg and then fried in a pen. It is nothing I would either prefer for dinner nor for lunch or even breakfest. In fact, I never tasted that sort of "Poor Knights";) myself. However, it is alleged to be quite popular in Germany--but I think this is up to personal as well as regional preferences. The open sandwich in the picture in question is simply referred to as "Toast", at least where I do live.
    gaer said:
    ... I never heard about a Cuisine Forum. That was before I joined WR.
    No, it was the topic of a rather successful thread meant as an April fool's joke.

    Ralf
     

    mnzrob

    Senior Member
    Chicago English and German
    Ralf said:
    Well, I know "Arme Ritter" as a slice of white bread dipped in milk and beaten egg and then fried in a pan.
    Ralf
    Mmm, this is what we call French Toast in america, and it's eaten for breakfast with syrup, and sometimes topped with strawberries(or other fruit) and whipped cream. Probably my favorite breakfast food. I have never seen it on a menu in Germany though. The french have it too (hence the american name for it?), it's called pain perdu.

    Rob
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ralf said:
    Well, I know "Arme Ritter" as a slice of white bread dipped in milk and beaten egg and then fried in a pen. It is nothing I would either prefer for dinner nor for lunch or even breakfest. In fact, I never tasted that sort of "Poor Knights";) myself. However, it is alleged to be quite popular in Germany--but I think this is up to personal as well as regional preferences. The open sandwich in the picture in question is simply referred to as "Toast", at least where I do live.
    Yes, you're completely right, but please click on the picture again, and search all the ingredients that you listed; they're "au-gratin'd (or browned)" with cheese, and all these ingredients are underneath.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    mnzrob said:
    Mmm, this is what we call French Toast in america, and it's eaten for breakfast with syrup, and sometimes topped with strawberries(or other fruit) and whipped cream. Probably my favorite breakfast food. I have never seen it on a menu in Germany though. The french have it too (hence the american name for it?), it's called pain perdu.

    Rob
    Yes, Rob. "French Toast" is the name I know. And the ingredients listed confirm that it is the same thing. It's cholesterol-hell though. :(

    Gaer
     
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