Belie and Betray

< Previous | Next >
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Welcome to the forum, Kalpab! Following GWB's suggestion: You might start with the Word Reference dictionary (see the search box at the top of the page). By the way, neither word is capitalized.
     

    xiaolijie

    Senior Member
    UK
    English (UK)
    From the question, it seems that kalpab has looked up the words (there is a contrast in meaning between "belie" and "betray") and needs some help:

    Belie: to hide (a true situation). Her wisdom belies her young age.
    Betray: to reveal (a true situation): His inappropriate response betrayed his inexperience.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    As has been noted, the differences are substantial. From the WR dictionary:

    belie/bɪˈlʌɪ/
    ▶verb (belies, belying, belied)
    • 1 fail to give a true notion of.

    • 2 fail to justify (a claim or expectation).

    betray/bɪˈtreɪ/
    ▶verb
    • 1 act treacherously towards (one's country) by aiding the enemy. ■ be disloyal to or inform on.

    • 2 unintentionally reveal; be evidence of: she drew a deep breath that betrayed her indignation
    Because the two words are quite different, we expect you to tell us what puzzles you about them. As for examples, please see our instructions to find examples in contemporary context -- seeing them in context will often be all you need to see the difference.
     

    kalpab

    New Member
    Assamese
    From the question, it seems that kalpab has looked up the words (there is a contrast in meaning between "belie" and "betray") and needs some help:

    Belie: to hide (a true situation). Her wisdom belies her young age.
    Betray: to reveal (a true situation): His inappropriate response betrayed his inexperience.
    That is exactly what I was looking for ; the examples are really good. Thanks a lot for that and thanks everyone for the responses.:)
     

    Eliana-Marie

    New Member
    ENGLISH
    Actually, there's a subtle similarity betw the words, which certainly justifiers kalpab's "confusion": the similarity is the both do not do justice to something.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top