bemanning

Robinvn

Senior Member
Dutch, Belgium
Hoi!

Volgende regel komt voor in mijn vertaling:
Een selecte groep van jongens en meisjes op de USS Independence mixen die informatie tot multimediaproducten.

Het probleem is dat ik jongens en meisjes nogal kinderachtig vind. Graag zou ik het vervangen door bemanning, maar dan komt het feit dat er zowel mannen als vrouwen aan boord zijn niet zo uit de verf (zoals in de brontekst wel het geval is).

Iemand suggesties?
Bedankt,
Robin
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    It is my understanding that in common usage, "bemanning" is gender-neutral, so I don't really see what the problem is.

    Is it because the root of the word is "mann"? Are you worried that feminists might find the term sexist?

    My Dutch is too basic for me to offer any other suggestions, but I would appreciate an explanation as to why you feel that "bemanning" cannot refer to both men and women.
     

    optimistique

    Senior Member
    elroy said:
    It is my understanding that in common usage, "bemanning" is gender-neutral, so I don't really see what the problem is.

    Is it because the root of the word is "mann"? Are you worried that feminists might find the term sexist?

    My Dutch is too basic for me to offer any other suggestions, but I would appreciate an explanation as to why you feel that "bemanning" cannot refer to both men and women.

    In fact, I hadn't even thought of the fact that 'bemanning' has 'man' as root. I don't think that's the problem at all.

    It's just that in general the crew of a ship consists mostly of men (especially in the navy). When I say 'sailor', you probably won't think it's a woman. So theoretically it's gender-neutral, but practically it has a preference for consisting of men. So it's normal for the 'bemanning' to consist of men, but when there are also women on board, then you'l have emphasize this through additional words.
    So it's not that it cannot refer to both gender, it's just that it's not obvious that it refers to women as well as to men.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Oh, I see. :) Thanks for the explanation.

    I guess in this context it was important for Robin to emphasize the presence of both men and women on board.
     

    Robinvn

    Senior Member
    Dutch, Belgium
    I couldn't explain it better, optimistique, thanks.
    Actually in the book, all text that follows isn't clear if I don't state that there are men as well as women in the ship's crew. I was thinking of other words than men and women because it is also significant that they are all very young. That's why I tried 'jongens en meisjes' in my first post.
    I'll think it over once more, thanks for your suggestions!
    Robin
     
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