bendy strip that seals paper tea packages

susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi,

What would you call that bendy strip that seals paper tea packages? The best I can come up with is, well, bendy strip :)

Also, does "paper tea package" work? I've also seen "paper tea package bag" but "bag" seems redundant.

Thank you!
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think you might have to find a picture of one (before I can help, at least). I'm not sure what bendy strip you are referring to:( (Although you are probably right that it's called a bendy strip:eek:!)
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I'm looking on Google and can't find it. It's a strip of bendy metal that you place at the top, horizontally. Then you roll the bag down and when you've rolled it enough you bend the extremities of the strip to hold that portion of the bag.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    In the US, it is much more common to encounter this in packages of coffee rather than tea. In my local supermarket, for example, you can buy loose coffee beans to grind at home, or you can have those beans ground in the store, but in either case the coffee will be packaged in a bag such as you describe. Apparently, such bags are called "tin-tie bags", and you can refer to the bendy strip as the "wire closure" at the top of the bag.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Speaking as a tea drinker in a coffee-drinking world, I can assure Mahantongo that you can buy tea this way in the U.S., too.

    I had no idea what that bendy thing might be called, though, so I googled around, and when I tried googling "coffee packages with built in bendy strip" (really!), I came up with "tab-lock bags." That at least is what a company called Uline calls them on its website.
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Tab lock sounds very clunky. I like tin-tie (or tin tie), and apparently it's widely used. Thank you both!
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thank you, Cenzontle and Julian Stuart! Cenzontle, it may be the case that "bendy" is used more in the UK. They have "bendy buses," for instance.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, but I don't see any "tying" taking place - it's all bending the ends... A twist tie, is surely one of those where you twist the ends together, which isn't the same thing.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Yes, but I don't see any "tying" taking place - it's all bending the ends... A twist tie, is surely one of those where you twist the ends together, which isn't the same thing.
    Both are made from fairly thick flexible plastic strip with a metal wire (or two) going through them to allow them to hold the folded bent or twisted shape - that's the similarity I see. Whether they are bent or twisted is "user selectable":D
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The ones on my bags of coffee weren't. :( They were about 1" longer than the bag was wide and all I could do is bend them round: I now feel cheated.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Both are made from fairly thick flexible plastic strip with a metal wire (or two) going through them to allow them to hold the folded bent or twisted shape - that's the similarity I see. Whether they are bent or twisted is "user selectable":D
    I think we're discussing the ones which consist of a solid strip of plastic-coated metal about 1/4" wide that are permanently attached across the back of the bag near the top. Less than an inch of the strip is available on each side so there is no chance of their meeting much less overlapping to be twisted together. Regardless, the metal part is too wide to twist. You fold the bag over several times and use the strip to "crimp" it shut. When the bag is shut, the strip is in the shape of a flattened staple not a knot.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think we're discussing the ones which consist of a solid strip of plastic-coated metal about 1/4" wide that are permanently attached across the back of the bag near the top. Less than an inch of the strip is available on each side so there is no chance of their meeting much less overlapping to be twisted together. Regardless, the metal part is too wide to twist. You fold the bag over several times and use the strip to "crimp" it shut. When the bag is shut, the strip is in the shape of a flattened staple not a knot.
    I know exactly what the bags are, use them frequently for coffee and think your description is very good. I posted a link to a picture of them in post # 8 where the seller used several words to describe them, including twist-ties. This was posted to reflect the situation that there is no agreed-upon standard word in English for the "combination of a bag and a strip of something that is manufactured like a sturdy twist tie". I thought it was quite clear that the similarity I described was how they are made and function by retaining their shape after being bent, folded or twisted because of the embedded metal wire. The topology of use does not change that. Obviously in the picture I posted and what the OP asked about, they do not function by twisting: I never actually said they were called twist-ties. I like the idea of calling them "bendy strips" but the front-runner for the word appears to be "tin-ties". I think a lot of people wouldn't know that - I didn't:D - I'd never seen the word before this thread.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top