benefit from someone or benefit from something

Joseph A

Senior Member
Kurdish
Hello everyone,
Is it okay to say "benifit from someone"? When someone wants to learn, you teach them or when they need something you provide it for them.
For example:
You can benifit from me.
Or should it always be followed by something as follows?
You can benifit from my knowledge.
 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It sounds a bit odd to me to use "benefit from [somebody]" like that: you normally benefit from what somebody does for you.

    You could probably do it as "You can benefit from having me as your teacher". :)

    PS: it's spelt "benefit" ;)
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    It sounds a bit odd to me to use "benefit from [somebody]" like that: you normally benefit from what somebody does for you.

    You could probably do it as "You can benefit from having me as your teacher". :)

    PS: it's spelt "benefit" ;)
    Thank you so much, DonnyB.
    I'm careless. I shouldn't have made that spelling mistake. :mad:
     
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