Bengali : Banglatown

L'irlandais

Senior Member
Ireland: English-speaking ♂
Hello,
My attempt with online translation বাংলা টাউন

How can this be written correctly in either Sadhubhaṣa (সাধুভাষা - "elegant language") or in Chôlitôbhasha (চলিতভাষা "current language")? Any tips on its pronunciation welcome too.

Background: There are well over a quarter of a million Bengalis in the UK. Apparently one third of the population in Tower Hamlets in East London is Bengali, with Bengali English being widely spoken. The area around Brick Lane has come to be called Banglatown.
295DDCB6-B44D-4BDC-BDBC-C066935F025B.jpeg
‘Banglatown’ is now the official name for Brick Lane and the surrounding area.This happened in 1997, after a campaign among local community activists aimed at getting recognition for the largest Bengali settlement in the UK. In 2001, the electoral ward of Spitalfields was renamed as Spitalfields and Banglatown Ward
Source Bengalis in East London
 
  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    In absence of Bengali speakers at the moment I think it's time to begin answering your question – let me start off by confirming that the transcription you have is correct: I've checked it in several dictionaries.

    I'm not quite certain about the pronunciation though.
     
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    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hello marrish,
    Thanks for that. I was just a little surprised that despite getting official/political recognition, I found no mention anywhere bilingual signage to mark the significant event. Whereas Brick Lane itself does have bilingual street signs. (Bengali: ব্রিক লেন)
     
    Last edited:

    stormmaashrooms

    New Member
    Bengali-Standard (Muslim) & English-USA
    Hello,
    My attempt with online translation বাংলা টাউন

    How can this be written correctly in either Sadhubhaṣa (সাধুভাষা - "elegant language") or in Chôlitôbhasha (চলিতভাষা "current language")? Any tips on its pronunciation welcome too.

    Background: There are well over a quarter of a million Bengalis in the UK. Apparently one third of the population in Tower Hamlets in East London is Bengali, with Bengali English being widely spoken. The area around Brick Lane has come to be called Banglatown.
    View attachment 34302

    Source Bengalis in East London
    Sure thing.
    I may be trash at understanding things, so please tell me if I was in fact not supposed to translate the couple of sentences you'd given.
    Just FYI, Sadhu Bhasha is wayyy outdated and pretty much never used unless you're doing a translation of a holy book or something, so I'm just writing in formal Chalita Bhasha. A lot of Bengal natives confuse Chalita "continuing" with Kathya "spoken" or Anchalik "regional" Bhasha, when in fact they are not the same. Chalita is the modern literary standard of Bengali which essentially contracts some Sadhu verbs and pronouns (among other things), whereas those other 'Bhashas' are not formally written. Anyhoo:

    Bengali: ভূমিকা: আড়াই লক্ষের চেয়েও বেশী বাঙালী যুক্তরাজ্যে থাকে। পূর্ব লণ্ডনের টাওয়ার হ্যামলেট্সের জনসংখ্যার এক তৃতীয়াংশ বাঙালী, যেখানে 'বাংলিশ' বলার (বিস্তৃত) প্রচলন রয়েছে। ব্রিক লেনের আশেপাশের এলাকাটি 'বাংলাটাউন' নামে পরিচিত হয়েছে।
    Transcription: Bhūmikā: Āṛāi lakkhēr cēyēō bēśī bāṅālī ǰuktorājyē thākē. Pūrbo laṇḍanēr ṭāwār hæmlēṭsēr janosaṅkhār æk tritīyāṅśo bāṅālī, ǰēkhānē 'bāṅliś' balār (bistrito) procolon royēchē. Brik lēnēr āśēpāśēr ælākāṭi 'bāṅlāṭāun' nāmē poricito hoyēchē.
    Literal Word-for-Word Translation: Introduction: two-and-a-half lakh's than-even more Bengali(s) in-the-United-Kingdom live. East London's Tower Hamlet's population's one third Bengali, whereat 'Banglish' speaking's (wide) usage has-stayed. Brick Lane's around the-area 'Banglatown' in-the-name known has-become.

    The word bistrito doesn't actually sound right but I was trying to be as true to the source sentences as I could, so I compromised and just put it in brackets. It's better to just not say it though.

    Pronunciation: uhh that would take too long for me to explain :/ I tried being phonetically accurate by modifying the transliteration to reflect the true pronunciation. Keep in mind that I wrote ô as a as that is how the big government boys do it, and is pronounced like the ng in sing. I think the other stuff should be discoverable on Wikipedia. Sorry about my sloth, friend :(

    Just on a cultural note, the Bengalis of London (and most of the UK) are in fact Sylheti. They and other Bengalis may or may not consider themselves to be the very same ethnicity, it just depends on the opinion of each individual. I have written in Bengali, but the Sylheti language would certainly translate differently (albeit their language isn't really standardised).
    cheers
     

    stormmaashrooms

    New Member
    Bengali-Standard (Muslim) & English-USA
    Wow, thanks very much. It is more than I hoped for.
    By the way, welcome to the forums. It’s good to have an answer from someone who is bilingual.:thumbsup:
    Not a problem, and thank you! However, I feel as if I have misunderstood what to translate :(
    Should I translate the actual quote from the paper? It's not much trouble for me.
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    No, no, that’s fine. The quoted text was just to give some background. I am glad you cleared up my misunderstanding about the two scripts. Also the explanation about the word order is much appreciated.
     

    stormmaashrooms

    New Member
    Bengali-Standard (Muslim) & English-USA
    No, no, that’s fine. The quoted text was just to give some background. I am glad you cleared up my misunderstanding about the two scripts. Also the explanation about the word order is much appreciated.
    Oh yes, of course. Please, please forgive me for my nitpickiness, but I would like to clarify that Chalita and Sadhu are written in the same Bengali/Eastern Nagari script (alphabet), and the difference between them is what those characters are used to write, mostly verb forms. The Sadhu writing style also promotes the use of Sanskrit words over Prakrit and foreign ones, as they are seen as pure and formal. These Bhashas would be classified as literary or written standards, and are written with the same letters.
    It's kinda-sorta comparable with the relationship between the modern standard English of today and the King James English in the Bible; the alphabet didn't change, but a lot of other stuff may have, but the changes are more evident in some places than others. For example:

    Sadhu: "কারণ ঈশ্বর জগৎকে এমন প্রেম করিলেন যে, আপনার একজাত পুত্রকে দান করিলেন, যেন, যে কেহ তাঁহাতে বিশ্বাস করে, সে বিনষ্ট না হয়, কিন্তু অনন্ত জীবন পায়"
    Kāraṇ īśwar jagaṯkē ēman prēm karilēn ǰē, āpanār ēkjāt putrakē dān karilēn, ǰēna, ǰē kēha tā̃hātē biśwās karē, sē binaṣṭa nā hay, kintu ananta jīban pāy
    Chalita: "কারণ ঈশ্বর জগৎকে এমন প্রেম করলেন যে, তিনি তাঁর একজাত পুত্রকে দান করলেন, যেন যে কেউ তাঁকে বিশ্বাস করে সে বিনষ্ট না হয় কিন্তু অনন্ত জীবন পায়"
    Kāraṇ īśwar jagaṯkē ēman prēm karlēn ǰē, tini tā̃r ēkjāt putrakē dān karlēn, ǰēna ǰē kēu tā̃kē biśwās karē sē binaṣṭa nā hay kintu ananta jīban pāy
    KJV: "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. "


    Keep in mind that the Chalita is being used to write a formal religious text, which causes it to seem more similar to Sadhu than it would if elsewhere.
     
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