beside the point

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dichelson

Senior Member
Italy/Italian
Hello: in the following passage I'm not sure about the meaning of "beside the point":

(here Steve is talking to himself) "The dragon has the advantage, his logical mind insisted. I want him, his soul answered. He can see in here, you can't. I'll be careful, he argued. The fact that he was terrified was beside the point".

Thank you for your help.
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    If something is "beside the point," it is irrelevant to the current discussion or has no effect.

    Think of it this way: if the "point" is the central issue, the focus, the important part, then something that is beside it is to the side, separate, and therefore not the focus.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    If something is "beside the point," it is irrelevant to the current discussion or has no effect.

    Think of it this way: if the "point" is the central issue, the focus, the important part, then something that is beside it is to the side, separate, and therefore not the focus.
    Then, it shouldn't be "besides the point", which also seems to be in use among native speakers??
     
    Last edited:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with HumbleUser. We would only say 'beside the point'.

    Beside is a preposition meaning 'next to'. When something is 'beside the point', it is next to the point and not on the point, where it is supposed to be.

    Besides means 'in addition to'. It may seem possible to say something like 'that's besides the point', meaning 'that's in addition to the point', but we don't don't say that. We would express the idea in a different way.

    Here is a thread that will help: Beside and besides.
     
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