Besides not having enough money

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
Let's forget about going to see Cats. Besides not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.




Does the line in bold sound right? What about the following version:
Besides our not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.

Your comment, please. Thanks.
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    While "our having enough money" is grammatical, I think it would be more natural to say:

    Besides the fact that we do not have enough money, the tickets are already sold out.

    You could also say:

    Even if we had enough money, the tickets are already sold out.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Let's forget about going to see Cats. Besides not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.




    Does the line in bold sound right? What about the following version:
    Besides our not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.

    Your comment, please. Thanks.
    It doesn't work, Quiet One. You'd have to say something like Besides our not having enough money, which is very clumsy.

    Be simple; say something like: we haven't enough money and the tickets are sold out.
     

    CarolSueC

    Senior Member
    USA--English
    Let's forget about going to see Cats. Besides not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.




    Does the line in bold sound right? What about the following version:
    Besides our not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.

    Your comment, please. Thanks.
    GreenWhiteBlue has given some good alternative wordings. The reason your original is not correct is that you have what is called a "dangling modifier." In other words the opening phrase appears to modify tickets, but it really refers to I or we. But I or we aren't mentioned so the modifier is left "dangling." The tickets are not what lack enough money. We are the ones who lack the money.
     

    tinlizzy

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Quiet Dandelion- Your original sentence is fine for speech. All the previous posters are correct but that's what I would say and it would sound like this.....

    Besiiiides not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.:(

    The intonation would replace the verbage.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The original would not be fine for speech here - it just would not be said.

    It's sold out, and anyway, I/we don't have the money.
    I/we don't have the money, and anyway, it's sold out.
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    Quiet Dandelion- Your original sentence is fine for speech. All the previous posters are correct but that's what I would say and it would sound like this.....

    Besiiiides not having enough money, the tickets are already sold out.:(

    The intonation would replace the verbage.
    The original sentence, in which you use "our" to indicate the "subject" (so to speak) of the gerund phrase as differentiated from the subject of the main clause, is grammatically correct.

    As soon as you take out the "our," it wanders into that realm of ambiguity, in which it *could* appear to someone that "tickets" is the subject of the gerund phrase.

    However, this is more just fine tuning.

    I believe that many people are likely to use the sentence proposed by tinlizzy and that it would be very unusual for someone to misunderstand it in real life.

    Karen
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    The original would not be fine for speech here - it just would not be said.

    It's sold out, and anyway, I/we don't have the money.
    I/we don't have the money, and anyway, it's sold out.
    Interesting, I think I would say (AE)

    --We/I don't have that money, besides, it's sold out.
    --It's sold out, besides, we/I don't have that money.
     
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