best/most well-behaved

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bantu

Senior Member
India - Hindi & English
Tiger won best/most well-behaved dog prize.
What should come: best or most?
(We can use 'best-behaved', can't we?)

And, which is right, "Sudanese women are the most/worst ill-treated in the world"?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    We can use "best-behaved", bantu.
    I would use "most" in the second sentence. "Worst ill-treated" is unnatural. "Worst-treated" is possible, but it looks strange to me.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Though "best-behaved" is better in this particular case, you could use "most well-behaved" but not "best well-behaved". It's about having the largest amount of a quality (good behavior), not about doing it the best.
     

    bantu

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Though "best-behaved" is better in this particular case, you could use "most well-behaved" but not "best well-behaved". It's about having the largest amount of a quality (good behavior), not about doing it the best.
    By removing "the" and the object of comparison, you have changed the meaning of the sentence.
    Suppose there is a dog show and all dogs are well-behaved so to speak; then? 'Best' can be used.
    And how does it change the meaning if one may ask? We may or may not use 'the'.
    'The' ill-treated 'ones/women/people'
     
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